Session Descriptions

Session Descriptions - 2022

  1. Techniques to Energize and Motivate the Beginning Band Student
    Richard Canter
    The first years of band are the most critical. In addition to the challenges many beginning band directors already face, many programs are in now need of a boost to quickly get back on track, due to lost instructional time throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. In this activity-based clinic, the clinician will discuss methodologies to differentiate instruction in order to prevent poor performance habits at an early age and motivate all levels of learners to reach their highest potential. Throughout this session, strategies will be given for teaching dynamics, articulation, as well as an innovative approach to rhythm/note reading that will improve your students' sight-reading abilities and overall musical literacy. Through quick, purposeful and effective assessment, along with the use of technology, students will be become motivated to reach incredibly high levels of achievement. This clinic is designed to improve individual student growth and overall retention in your band program.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Westborough

  2. Elementary Choral Reading Session
    Matthew Buono, Sara Santos
    Come sing through some selected materials of Elementary Chorus music. We will sing unison and 2-part songs for a broad range of elementary skilled choirs. We are excited to share a variety of great music.
    Choral, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Southborough

  3. Making Meaning: Responding to Culture Through Music Education
    Brian Gellerstein, Jarritt A. Sheel
    Do you want to teach through a culturally responsive lens but don't know where to begin? At its core, culturally responsive teaching is about the continual learning of students' worlds through the engagement of art and music from their cultures. This session will help music teachers make sense of culturally responsive pedagogy by providing a framework from which to build bridges between student and teacher lives and experiences.
    General Interest, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Sterling

  4. SEL in the Elementary General Music Classroom
    Allyson Rottman
    SEL is now a required component of all lessons. I will share strategies I use to meet all five CASEL competencies and then open it up to a forum to share ideas.
    General Music, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Northborough

  5. Play On Music Festival
    Ruth Debrot, Tom Westmoreland
    The Play On Music Festival is an annual event for music educators and students to come together and share in the various forms of music-making that exists in today’s schools. Our festival brings students together from different age groups who are participating in contemporary ensembles or creative music-making in their schools. There is an opportunity for your students to perform and share what you do at your school, but you can attend this festival without performing or participate with us virtually. Play On is open to all groups from elementary through high school. Join us to hear about our successes over the past 9 years and to hear about the exciting lineup of workshops and featured artists who will provide your students with an incredible experience at this year's FREE event!
    Innovations, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Boxborough

  6. Teaching Outside the Box: Students with Disabilities in Private Music Lessons
    Ben Tan
    The population of students studying music privately has become increasingly diverse in terms of their learning schemes, strengths, and challenges. Many private studio teachers struggle to reach students with disabilities and diagnoses in their lessons. Ben Tan has been teaching private lessons in piano, composition, and voice to students with disabilities at the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs for several years. In this session, he will share tips, strategies, and approaches that can help private instructors to effectively reach every student. By thinking and teaching outside the box of the conventional private lesson, studio teachers can open up the world of music to every student.
    Special Learners, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Hudson

  7. String Instrument Maintenance: Problems & Solutions for the Orchestra Teacher
    Johnson String
    The workshops of Johnson String Instrument & Carriage House Violins see thousands of bowed string instruments every year. In this session, with the assistance of one of our luthiers, we will cover how to identify & address the most common instrument problems and discuss the most frequently asked repair and adjustment questions.
    Strings, Tues, 9:00-9:50, Wayland

  8. Anti-Racist Action from the Podium
    Rachel Maxwell
    The traits of exceptional ensemble teacher-conductors and the culturally responsive warm demander may be blended to develop an environment of support, collegiality, and accomplishment. Demand, high levels of challenge and teacher control, insistence, and persistence to accomplish the task with exceptional quality are familiar to the band world. An appropriate challenge and rigorous expectations yield high results. What is new to the band world is the incorporation of Culturally Relevant Teaching strategies in teacher training and professional development. White teachers may feel overwhelmed or intimidated by taking on the mantle of social justice. Warm demander pedagogy supplies a straightforward and flexible framework that maintains the concert band's practical traditions and helps teachers develop meaningful and supportive relationships with students. Once self-efficacy in warm demander pedagogy increases for teachers, they may be more open to incorporating more culturally responsive teaching and social justice strategies. All students, Black or White, deserve a caring environment with a teacher with whom they feel connected, safe, and willing to stretch themselves for musical vulnerability and risks. The goal of a warm demander is to lead to greater understanding, connection, and compassion for all students.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Westborough

  9. DAPP: A Framework for Africentric Music Education for All
    Georgiary Bledsoe
    Black music traditions are foundational to American culture and it is important to engage this music in ways that are grounded in lived experience. Dr. Bledsoe will discuss a systematic framework to support music educators of all backgrounds in engaging Africentric music - DAPP (Dispositions, Aims, Pedagogy and Practice), and will share strategies for putting the framework into action.
    General Interest, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Sudbury

  10. Just Gender: Pathways to Inclusivity in the Music Classroom
    Aer Queen, Nicholas Prosini, Michele Hobizal
    We're not all guys!' This session will feature ways to use language and actions to show your school community that everyone is valued, and belongs in your space. We approach inclusivity in an organic way that will be a natural fit in your existing teaching practice. We will include children's literature and free digital resources to center gender inclusivity at school. Participants will engage in activities designed to encourage personal reflection on gender. We aim to help participants see themselves with their own eyes as a way to help students do the same - for themselves and other students' genders.
    General Interest, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Sterling

  11. Uke Can Do It! Ukulele for the Elementary General Music Classroom
    Ashley Ferrara
    Uke can do it! Ukulele for the Elementary General Music Classroom will help teachers to differentiate their instruction to meet the needs of elementary students as they take on the challenge of learning the ukulele. This session will provide ready-to-use lesson plans, materials, ideas, and sources to make learning the ukulele fun and meaningful for our younger learners. Bring your instrument if you have one, and be prepared to join in the fun!
    General Music, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Northborough

  12. Hip-Hop in the Music Classroom
    Meaghan O'Connor-Vince
    This session will explore how to effectively use Hip-Hop and MusicFirst software as tools to teach students listening skills, composition, analysis and evaluation of music, sequencing, recording, and basic production techniques. This presentation provides a Hip-Hop composition unit with descriptions of lessons, resources, rubrics, and general student directions intended to produce tangible and authentic assessments of student learning for each project/song.
    Composition, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Boxborough

  13. Teaching Music and Art to Students with Disabilities
    Kayla McLaughlin
    The interdisciplinary connections between music and art can create opportunities for music educators. Some students thrive when music and art are intertwined in lessons and activities. For students with disabilities, art and music can reinforce each other and facilitate powerful learning. Presenter Kayla McLaughlin has developed and taught a highly effective music and art curriculum for students with disabilities. Learn how to create engaging lessons in music and art that will provide meaningful opportunities for students with disabilities. This session will present practical tools and strategies that you can use in your classes next week!
    Special Learners, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Hudson

  14. Elementary String Orchestra Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli
    This reading session will review the newest publications for elementary string orchestra. Come and bring your instrument to sight read music from beginning orchestra music through easy literature.
    Strings, Tues, 10:00-10:50, Wayland

  15. MMEA General Meeting
    Come and take part in MMEA's planning for the future.
    Tues, 11:00-11;50, Salons A-E

  16. Fostering Meaningful Feedback through the Critical Response Process
    Kelly Bylica, Jesse Rathgeber
    Feedback plays an essential role in music education, helping individuals learn to consider creative works from multiple perspectives. In this session, we explore the Critical Response Process, a four-step process for engaging with artistic works-in-progress. Founded on the principle that both student-artists and responders play active roles in feedback, this process is designed to promote discovery and help students learn how to engage in a responsive feedback dialogue with others. Options and examples of how to explore this process with students of varying ages (elementary through adults) and in various settings (general music, ensembles, and community) will also be shared.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Westborough

  17. Teaching Young Percussionists: Fundamentals for Your Beginners
    David Wolf
    This clinic will focus on fundamental skills and concepts that are necessary to set up your young, budding percussionists with the information for their success, as well as yours as their teacher. Concepts related to Snare Drum and Mallet Percussion will be the focus. Topics to include equipment set up, grip, body position, stroke types, and tone production. This clinic is aimed at the elementary school beginning band director, but could be equally helpful for middle and high school directors as a review of important fundamental percussion concepts.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Southborough

  18. Musically Meaningful Improvisation in Early Childhood
    Heather Kirby
    Preschool and Kindergarten children are capable of much more sophistication in their musicking than most would imagine! Their improvisations provide a peek into what is really going on in their musical minds. This session will present techniques for engaging young children in rhythm, tonal, and melodic improvisation, along with examples of student work.
    Composition, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Sudbury

  19. Immersive musical learning with children with autism spectrum disorder: The EcoSonic Playground Project at ABATEC Boston
    Elissa Johnson-Green, Michaela Kiberstis
    The EcoSonic Playground Project (ESPP) provides open access to music education through an immersive learning program comprising musical improvisation and composition, sustainability and STEM education, and design thinking. Children build large-scale sound sculptures out of recycled materials and PVC pipe that become ensemble instruments. The ESPP is an inclusive, socially oriented program focused on teamwork, and adaptable to diverse learning environments. This session will report on an ESPP collaboration with a psychologist specializing in ASD and ABATEC Boston, provider of social learning for children with ASD. It will highlight the children's approach to the ESPP and what they taught us.
    General Interest, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Sterling

  20. Defying White Supremacy: Responsible Engagement in Music Classrooms
    Brian Gellerstein
    If you feel friction between the expectations of music teaching and your own values, you are not alone. In this session we will unpack some of the ways White supremacy presents in our classrooms and discuss responsibility as a key driver to opposing White supremacy in music education.
    General Music, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Northborough

  21. Elementary 'Ukulele Exploration
    Miles Wilcox
    What's the happiest instrument in the world? The 'ukulele, of course! Come learn the basics of playing the 'ukulele (for those new to the instrument) and the basics of elementary instruction (for those new to teaching it). The 'ukulele can be used to teach and reinforce concepts & standards you are already covering in a new and fun way, and can be a minimal learning curve for educators. We will discuss teaching hints and tricks, differentiation among grade levels K through 5, including tips for working with neurodiverse students
    Innovations, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Boxborough

  22. Fostering Enthusiasm in Your Elementary String Program
    Alicia Winslow
    This session will cover both tried & true as well as new & innovative ideas to foster enthusiasm in the elementary string program. Educators will be provided with inspiration and resources that they will be able to implement in their own programs. Participants will also be invited to join in the discussion and share their best ideas & practices as well.
    Strings, Tues, 12:00-12:50, Wayland

  23. Getting off the Page: Approaching Jazz Improv with Beginners
    Kate Ferris Richardson
    Experience improvisation activities for beginning band students that you can bring into your next rehearsal or lesson group. Don't miss this hands-on workshop (bring an instrument *pending COVID protocols) for teachers of all levels of jazz experience or comfort ...beginning to expert. Orchestra and recorder specialists are welcome too!
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Westborough

  24. Composition Activities for General Music Students: Basic to Advanced
    Ruth Debrot
    Composing in middle school general music is an engaging way to teach musicals skills and independence. By composing, students learn to work collaboratively, think creatively, refine and revise ideas, and to reflect on their own work and the work of peers. By engaging in creative artistic processes, students develop critical thinking skills, aural skills, conceptual understandings, and the ability to express their ideas about the world in a personal and meaningful way. Happily, one need not be a composer to teach composition!
    Composition, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Sudbury

  25. Deciphering the “Urban” Code: Pre-service Music Teachers and the City
    Brian Gellerstein, Jarritt A. Sheel
    Music education programs often prepare students to teach in suburban communities far removed from the realities of teaching in 'urban' public schools and districts. Understanding the roles that race, class, and location play in music education is frequently missing from pre-service curricula. This session aims to untangle the often coded language used to describe the schools and music programs inside the commonwealth's large cities to give future music teachers a basis to frame their future work.
    General Interest, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Sterling

  26. Finding My Voice: Improvisation and Music Games that Build Confidence in Young Children
    Sara Zur
    As young children develop their musical identities, providing opportunities for them to successfully demonstrate their individuality and competence are crucial in fostering a lifetime of joyful music making (O'Neal, 2002). Many music teachers believe that all children are innately musical, yet perspectives vary widely on what musicality looks like in children (Hallam, S. & Prince, V., 2003). Shouldice (2020) observed that teachers' beliefs about musicality are quite influential to a child's perception of their musical competence. Though there are many influences on what makes someone feel 'musical,' peer judgement and comparison have a large impact on even the youngest musicians (Shouldice, 2020). Participants in this workshop will engage in musical activities wherein social interaction helps build confidence and where judgement is mitigated. Using puppet play, movement activities, and singing games, we will explore self-expression and individuality in a joyful and relaxed setting.
    General Music, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Northborough

  27. Music, Social Emotional Learning, and Students with Disabilities
    Marlene Markard
    Social-emotional learning (SEL) is a process through which students acquire critical life skills that help them succeed in their academic careers and beyond.  For young musicians, SEL guides students in developing effective practice habits, time management skills, active listening skills, problem solving skills, collaborative skills, responsible decision-making skills, the ability to self-regulate in class and on stage, and much more.  In this session, music educator, Marlene Markard, will outline the five core social-emotional learning (SEL) competencies and discuss practical SEL strategies that music educators can use to transform their inclusive music classes and private instrument lessons.
    Special Learners, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Hudson

  28. The Suzuki Method as a Framework
    Taylor Stobinski
    A workshop that will explore the benefits and strengths of teaching children in group settings through the Suzuki Method. This session will explore different aspects of the methodology, pedagogical approaches, and how these foundational ideas can be flexibly implemented in the conventional classroom.
    Strings, Tues, 1:00-1:50, Wayland

  29. The Art of The Start: Excellence in Your Beginning Band
    Rachel Maxwell
    This session will provide strategies to help your youngest band students achieve high levels of success. The daily routines and procedures which develop excellence in beginner students are the key to establishing habits to carry them through life. Topics will also include classroom management, Beginning Band literature; method books and materials; pedagogical fundamentals‐embouchure and hand position; equipment recommendations; recruitment and retention; diagnosing common problems in young players; making it fun for you and your students; and more. The Traughber Junior High School Band program has started and developed thousands of young musicians over the past 28 years. Our fieldwork can help you have increased success sooner and more easily with your most important students‐your beginners.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Westborough

  30. Sigma Alpha Iota Award Presentation (Private Ceremony) Stephanie Riley
    General Music, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Southborough

  31. What Does a Gender-Friendly Music Room Look Like? Stories from the Field for K-12 Educators
    Christy Whittlesey
    Transgender and nonbinary students experience a wide range of challenges as they navigate our educational systems and our music programs. Within this context, many educators may want to support these students but are unsure of how to do so effectively -- and others may resist engaging on this topic altogether. In this session, Chelmsford music teachers will share examples from their own practice in creating gender-friendly music programs at the elementary and high school levels. The session will also present guidance to empower participants to foster inclusive, equitable learning environments for transgender and nonbinary students at all levels.
    General Interest, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Sterling

  32. Creating Meaningful Movement Opportunities
    Michele Hobizal
    Movement encompasses a need for self-awareness and cultural understanding. Through movement students work toward a deeper sense of unity that helps to enhance community development in the classroom. We will look at creating meaningful opportunities for students to engage in movement and dance.
    General Music, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Northborough

  33. MMEA Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Access - Listening Session
    DEIA Committee/Tom W
    Innovations, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Boxborough

  34. The Mindful Musician
    Michael Galvin
    In this session we will dive into some mindful actions and yoga poses to help with seated and standing posture, breath work, and upper body mobility. We will explore the ways that yoga and meditation help to cultivate and spread awareness through the body, and we will endeavor to turn that awareness inwards, to examine the way we approach the study and performance of music, both in the classroom and at home. Learn some simple ways to incorporate mindfulness into your practice of teaching and of music!
    Strings, Tues, 2:00-2:50, Wayland

  35. Brass Made Easier – Universal Concepts for Brass Playing
    Gregory Lessard
    Playing and teaching brass instruments can be very challenging and very rewarding! Working on the basics consistently over time can yield tremendous results while keeping things simple. You don’t need to be the world’s greatest soloist to be able to educate your brass students well. Teaching and reinforcing the fundamentals will provide your students with a solid foundation for success. This workshop will feature a review of some easy, universal concepts for all brass instruments. Several tips that only brass players know will be included. In addition, information will be shared on how to start beginners and how to help your All State candidates improve. All of these tips and ideas are quick to employ and they are sure to help your students succeed.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 3:00-3:50, Westborough

  36. At the Nexus of the Expressive Arts, Social-Emotional Learning, and Eco-Literate Pedagogy
    Nicholas Quigley
    Those of us who are lucky to still be alive have been living through a pandemic for over two years. Mirroring the pandemic is deady backlash to movements for racial and climate equity. Capitalist violence that demands students and teachers continue to work through such traumatic events should be met with educational approaches that honor humanity, nourish souls, and provide methods of understanding and processing complex thoughts, emotions, and feelings. This session will provide an introduction to how the expressive and creative arts can play such a role while facilitating learning aligned with traditional musical standards.
    General Interest, Tues, 3:00-3:50, Sterling

  37. More than Diverse Repertoire: Culturally Responsive Music Instruction
    Ashley Cuthbertson
    Not a bundle of strategies or just diversifying musical repertoire, Culturally Responsive Teaching is a mind shift change and pedagogy that centers the backgrounds and funds of knowledge of our learners in order to build brainpower. In this session, we will discuss how music educators can move towards culturally responsive instruction to ensure that the learning environment and instruction is affirming, relevant, meaningful, and authentic for ALL our students. We will examine the foundations of culturally responsive teaching and explore practical applications in music curricula in regards to mindset, learning environment, musical content & repertoire, and instructional planning.
    Innovations, Tues, 3:00-3:50, Boxborough

  38. Back to "Bass"-ics
    Zach Sawyer
    This session is geared toward string teachers who are interested in learning more about how to support the bassists in their orchestra. Topics covered will include: setting up beginners (including sizing); switching students from other instruments; basics of finger patterns and scale fingerings; bowing considerations; what to look for when purchasing; instrument care and basic repairs; solo and chamber music repertoire; ideas for keeping advanced students engaged when the bass part in your orchestral literature is "less than exciting."
    Strings, Tues, 3:00-3:50, Wayland

  39. Ableton Live for the creative composer
    Wiggz Caro
    Exploring the creative possibilities for music production and composition, Ableton Certified trainer Wigbert Caro showcases the versatile uses of this well-known program to fuel musical inspiration, remix ideas, and merge the composition process with performance. 
    Technology, Tues, 3:00-3:50, Weston

  40. Beginning Band Success in a Hybrid World
    Kate Ferris Richarson
    PIVOT! How many times have we band directors heard this word in this post-COVID landscape? Keep your beginners learning and your program growing whether the day gives you in-person, hybrid, synchronous, asynchronous, indoor, or outdoor instruction. Tips, tricks, hacks, and tools to navigate this new teaching landscape while your beginners navigate their new instruments.
    Band/Jazz, Tues, 4:00-4:50, Westborough

  41. Disengaging Teachings: Facing Down White Supremacy in Music Education
    Brian Gellerstein
    The tentacles of White supremacy are complex and persist throughout music education. Acknowledging White supremacy, recognizing it, and taking action against it are interrelated steps in a cyclical process. This session will provide a framework for music teachers to learn about, recognize, and challenge White supremacy within their content and practices. Through deliberate efforts to understand the context of White supremacy in music education, educators can begin to recognize the ways it shows up in classrooms.
    General Interest, Tues, 4:00-4:50, Sterling

  42. The Basics of Modular Synthesis 
    Piotr Garbaczonek , Chee-Ping Ho
    An exploration of the principles of modular synthesis, as well as its digital counterparts, and how it may be utilized as a powerful tool in music production and sound design.
    Technology, Tues, 4:00-4:50, Weston

  43. Eastern District Meeting, Tues, 5:00-6:00, Southborough

  44. Western District Meeting, Tues, 5:00-6:00, Northborough

  45. Triage Your Woodwinds! A Lecture/Recital by the Woodwind Trio “Triage”
    Amy McGlothlin, Bill Kirkley
    Join Triage Woodwind Ensemble for a lecture-recital sampling works for flute, clarinet, and sax. Bring together your three most common woodwinds while improving ensemble playing through chamber music. How to build the concert and contest repertoire through transcriptions and commissions.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Westborough

  46. Elementary Choral Reading Session
    Matthew Buono, Sara Santos
    Come sing through some selected materials of Elementary Chorus music. We will sing unison and 2-part songs for a broad range of elementary skilled choirs. We are excited to share a variety of great music.
    Choral, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Southborough

  47. Hip-Hop on the Fly: Get your Classical Wings
    Courtney Powers
    Hip-Hop is one of the most listened to gene of music in American but it is not represented fully in state competitions and music education college prep courses. Hip-Hop- how to listen and arrange it is a clear 20/20 vision for the future of Music Education. Participants will learn how to find samples that have classical music in them, then take that, find a flow and start to rhyme. Each group will have a song with a classical sample, look at 'flow styles' then the creation begins. In their group participants will write a rap using the knowledge that they can obtain about said composer then participants will showcase their talents to the room.
    Composition, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Sudbury

  48. Making Meaning: Responding to Culture Through Music Education
    Brian Gellerstein, Jarritt A. Sheel
    Do you want to teach through a culturally responsive lens but don't know where to begin? At its core, culturally responsive teaching is about the continual learning of students' worlds through the engagement of art and music from their cultures. This session will help music teachers make sense of culturally responsive pedagogy by providing a framework from which to build bridges between student and teacher lives and experiences.
    General Interest, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Sterling

  49. A Pedagogy of Love: Transforming Teaching and Learning in Music Education
    Ruth Debrot
    The purpose of this Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) project was to examine teaching and learning in the undergraduate music education program at Boston University. By working collaboratively, with students, we will seek to determine if the undergraduate curriculum meets the pedagogical, social, and emotional needs of pre-service students. Our work will be guided by Freire's (1998) dialogic conception of the teacher/mentor as co-learner and we will use a humanizing, problem-posing approach grounded in love, action and understanding (Nhat Hanh, 2007). We intend that student researchers will be able to position themselves as educators, lifelong learners, and producers of knowledge.
    Innovations, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Boxborough

  50. Celtic Fiddle Tunes For String Orchestra
    Elizabeth Anderson
    Bring your instrument and learn a variety of fiddle tunes suitable for beginning to intermediate orchestra. We will also discuss strategies for teaching fiddle music in the traditional manner, by ear. No matter your experience level with learning and teaching fiddle by ear, you can enhance your orchestra curriculum and your students' aural skills with fiddle music!
    Strings, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Wayland

  51. Noteflight and Noteflight Learn
    Brian Rabuse, Rebecca Hoffmann
    Noteflight is a powerful music notation program that integrates with Google Classroom and other learning management systems. It is web-based, so it works on any platform including Chomebooks. In this session, Brian and Rebecca will show you how they use Noteflight in many different settings including band, guitar, music theory and choir classes.
    Technology, Wed, 9:00-9:50, Weston

  52. Student Leadership in the Marching Band: A Win-Win For All
    Tim Anderson
    Student leadership is at the core of how the UMass Minuteman Marching Band operates. This session will include the perspective of a student leader, and explain how they are chosen, what their responsibilities are, and what the benefits are to all parties involved (the director, the student leaders, and the band as a whole). The UMass model is something that can be adapted for use in not just marching bands, but all school music ensembles.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Westborough

  53. ACDA Middle School Choral Reading Session
    Nhung Truong
    Be sure to bring a device with which you will be able to access the virtual choral music for this session!
    Choral, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Southborough

  54. Hip-Hop in the Music Classroom
    Meaghan O'Connor-Vince
    This session will explore how to effectively use Hip-Hop and MusicFirst software as tools to teach students listening skills, composition, analysis and evaluation of music, sequencing, recording, and basic production techniques. This presentation provides a Hip-Hop composition unit with descriptions of lessons, resources, rubrics, and general student directions intended to produce tangible and authentic assessments of student learning for each project/song.
    Composition, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Sudbury

  55. Just Gender: Pathways to Inclusivity in the Music Classroom
    Aer Queen, Nicholas Prosini
    We're not all guys!' This session will feature ways to use language and actions to show your school community that everyone is valued, and belongs in your space. We approach inclusivity in an organic way that will be a natural fit in your existing teaching practice. We will include children's literature and free digital resources to center gender inclusivity at school. Participants will engage in activities designed to encourage personal reflection on gender. We aim to help participants see themselves with their own eyes as a way to help students do the same - for themselves and other students' genders.
    General Interest, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Sterling

  56. Defying White Supremacy: Responsible Engagement in Music Classrooms
    Brian Gellerstein
    If you feel friction between the expectations of music teaching and your own values, you are not alone. In this session we will unpack some of the ways White supremacy presents in our classrooms and discuss responsibility as a key driver to opposing White supremacy in music education.
    General Music, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Northborough

  57. Students with High Support Needs and Music
    Rachel Weishoff
    Differentiating instruction for students with high support needs can be extremely challenging for music educators. Clinician Rachel Weishoff brings years of experience working with this population to her music teaching. In this session, you will learn strategies to support the learning of students with high support needs so that they can experience music and engage in authentic music learning. Resources and strategies will be provided that you will be able to incorporate into your teaching right away.
    Special Learners, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Hudson

  58. String Instrument Maintenance: Problems & Solutions for the Orchestra Teacher
    Johnson String
    The workshops of Johnson String Instrument & Carriage House Violins see thousands of bowed string instruments every year. In this session, with the assistance of one of our luthiers, we will cover how to identify & address the most common instrument problems and discuss the most frequently asked repair and adjustment questions.
    Strings, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Wayland

  59. Creating Digital Portfolios: Part 2
    Brian Sheehan
    Get the tools you need to help students create their own digital musical diaries to process their musical identities and grow as musicians. Discover how easy it is for you keep them engaged in developmentally appropriate, standards based learning experiences.
    Technology, Wed, 10:00-10:50, Weston

  60. Creating, Responding, and Connecting in the Ensemble Setting
    Dan Albert
    Ever wonder how you can teach music besides having your students learn to play repertoire for a concert? We will explore ways to infuse composing, arranging, informal music learning, and music technology with existing teaching techniques in ensemble settings. Session attendees will also learn how to integrate technology, composition, and informal music learning projects into concert/public performances using standard band literature. This approach will not only improve individuals' musicianship but also provide them with skills for lifelong music-making.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Westborough

  61. Choose-Your-Own Arrangement: Agency in the Secondary Choir Classroom
    Abigail Varsos
    How do you encourage engagement from singers in short or infrequent choir rehearsals? How can you integrate elements of composition into traditional rehearsed ensembles? It all starts with arranging. By giving your students options, letting them test them out, and ultimately leaving the decisions up to them, your young singers can develop their ears and their compositional skills! Learn how to give your students agency, allowing them to create their own versions of songs they learn rote while still maintaining control over your students. Take a closer look at this style of rehearsing and learning through the Beatles' "Hey Jude."
    Choral, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Southborough

  62. DAPP: A Framework for Africentric Music Education for All
    Georgiary Bledsoe
    Black music traditions are foundational to American culture and it is important to engage this music in ways that are grounded in lived experience. Dr. Bledsoe will discuss a systematic framework to support music educators of all backgrounds in engaging Africentric music - DAPP (Dispositions, Aims, Pedagogy and Practice), and will share strategies for putting the framework into action.
    General Interest, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Sterling

  63. Gender Responsive Music Education
    Birce Tanriguden
    In order to create learning environments and school community that embrace and honor gender diversity, identifying general music lesson materials and practices that create barriers to this diversity is a necessity for establishing gender responsive music education. Once it is created, sustainability of gender responsive music education requires the development of teaching approaches, the creation of model lessons plans, and the evaluation of materials through a gender-responsive lens. This session is designed for the music teachers who would like to create and/or sustain gender responsive education in their classrooms.
    General Music, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Northborough

  64. Come One, Come All - Build A Modern Music Program
    Heather Fortune
    In this session, I will present an overview of High School Ensembles at Friends Select School, which includes a unified instrumental ensemble and small ensembles drawn from student interests. We will investigate learner-centered ensemble structures, culturally responsive modes of music teaching and learning, and we will explore arranging as a pedagogical tool aimed at challenging each individual student at their appropriate level. We will make the case for wide-ranging, multi-genre programming as well as for making space in your performance class for your students to engage in their own creative music-making.
    Innovations, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Boxborough

  65. Using Technology in Music Education with Students with Disabilities
    Tomas Marquez
    Whether you have no technology budget or a full music technology lab, there are ways that you can incorporate music technology into your teaching that will help you to better reach every student. In this session, you will learn about and gain experience with low tech, mid tech, and high tech options that you can use to reach every learner in your music classes and ensembles. Clinician Tomas Marquez brings more than a decade of experience with music technology to his teaching. He will share a wide range of tools and approaches that can help you in your work with all of your students, including students with disabilities.
    Special Learners, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Hudson

  66. String (COVID) Positives; Promoting Lifelong Playing
    Susan Memoli
    Panel discussion on promising musical moments, breakthroughs, and connections that might help strengthen string programs for the future. Lifelong music making over resume building.
    Strings, Wed, 11:00-11;50, Wayland

  67. A Practical Approach to Music education in the Wind Band
    Michael Mucci
    This session will include pedagogical reflection and practical ideas that you can incorporate into your wind band program tomorrow. The thoughts and techniques featured in this forum were developed over the span of a thirty-five year teaching career in the Longmeadow High School Instrumental Music Program. Each attendee should be prepared to share one effective strategy or idea that they alone have developed and is perhaps unique to their program - until now!
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 12:00-12:50, Westborough

  68. "Help! I Have Too Many Amazing Sopranos and Altos!" (Repertoire for the High School Treble Choir)
    Sarah Labrie, Kendra Nutting
    A virtual reading packet will be provided for this session. For an optimal singing experience, please bring a tablet/laptop. There are many stereotypes that exist about the high school treble choir, mainly that these groups are ’second-tier,’ or that they consist of ’leftover‘ students who were not good enough to get into the top mixed ensemble. This session will provide quality repertoire of varying difficulty levels written specifically for treble choirs (not for boychoirs, not transcriptions of pre-existing SATB/TTBB repertoire) to help ensure that the high school treble choir gets a high quality choral experience, the same respect and attention from the director and community as their SATB ensemble colleagues, and a space where they feel proud to share their voice.
    Choral, Wed, 12:00-12:50, Southborough

  69. It's Not All About You: Creating a Truly Student Centered Musical Learning Environment
    Sean Bilodeau, Maxwell Evrard
    Music is one of the few things in this world which EVERYONE can enjoy, and yet frequently our content and methods unintentionally make music seem elitist and inaccessible. We wouldn't be who we are without our students, but sometimes our ensembles and classes run in a way that serves our ego more than creating a love and appreciation of music that the student can take with them when they leave. This session will discuss how the Holliston High School music department focuses on giving students a strong voice in how and what they learn while presenting content in a pedagogically sound manner, helping them attain the knowledge they need to be successful musicians and musical advocates regardless of their career choice. Topics will include: creating non ensemble performance based classes, music technology and the role our recording studio plays in our program, incorporating hip hop, beat making, and sampling in our classes, standards based grading, as well as how using a student centered approach in a traditional ensemble setting can make your ensemble even stronger. Although we teach at a high school level these concepts apply to any level and all are welcome!
    Composition, Wed, 12:00-12:50, Sudbury

  70. Immersive musical learning with children with autism spectrum disorder: The EcoSonic Playground Project at ABATEC Boston
    Elissa Johnson-Green, Michaela Kiberstis
    The EcoSonic Playground Project (ESPP) provides open access to music education through an immersive learning program comprising musical improvisation and composition, sustainability and STEM education, and design thinking. Children build large-scale sound sculptures out of recycled materials and PVC pipe that become ensemble instruments. The ESPP is an inclusive, socially oriented program focused on teamwork, and adaptable to diverse learning environments. This session will report on an ESPP collaboration with a psychologist specializing in ASD and ABATEC Boston, provider of social learning for children with ASD. It will highlight the children's approach to the ESPP and what they taught us.
    General Interest, Wed, 12:00-12:50, Sterling

  71. Software Tools for Sight Reading & Performance Assessment
    Jim Frankel
    Accuracy is essential for your students' success. You want to help them improve their sight singing accuracy, and you also need to be able to reliably and accurately assess their performance proficiency. Discover software tools that will build these skills through aural training and increasingly rigorous exercises, as well as automated assessment to help you target problem areas and increase your ensemble's confidence with new repertoire.
    Technology, Wed, 12:00-12:50, Weston

  72. Introduction to Afro-Cuban rhythms
    Fumi Tomita
    This clinic introduces concepts and ideas for integrating rhythm into music courses by using rhythms derived from Afro-Cuban music, including the tumbao, cascara, and montuno rhythms as well as those in 6/8. Though most suitable for general music classes, those teaching jazz courses would particularly benefit from the exercises in rhythm, syncopation, and polyrhythm. Suggested applications to improvisation and standard jazz repertoire are included as well.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Westborough

  73. Music Technology as Effective Pedagogy: How Digital Audio Workstations Develop Skills and Cultivate Creativity
    David Casali
    As music technology increases in popularity, many educators are looking to include more of it in their classrooms. And while there are numerous applications available, many lack real pedagogical value. In this session we will explore one highly effective, free form of music technology: digital audio workstations (DAW), through practical, standards-based projects that can be plugged into your existing curriculum. We will work with two important concepts: remixing and sampling, and discover how these can be used to foster student creativity and develop musical skills. Participants will also receive step-by-step unit plans for other DAW-based projects at varying difficulty levels.
    Composition, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Sudbury

  74. What Does a Gender-Friendly Music Room Look Like? Stories from the Field for K-12 Educators
    Christy Whittlesey
    Transgender and nonbinary students experience a wide range of challenges as they navigate our educational systems and our music programs. Within this context, many educators may want to support these students but are unsure of how to do so effectively -- and others may resist engaging on this topic altogether. In this session, Chelmsford music teachers will share examples from their own practice in creating gender-friendly music programs at the elementary and high school levels. The session will also present guidance to empower participants to foster inclusive, equitable learning environments for transgender and nonbinary students at all levels.
    General Interest, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Sterling

  75. MMEA Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Access - Listening Session
    DEIA Committee/Tom W
    Innovations, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Boxborough

  76. String Instrument Maintenance: Problems & Solutions for the Orchestra Teacher
    Johnson String
    The workshops of Johnson String Instrument & Carriage House Violins see thousands of bowed string instruments every year. In this session, with the assistance of one of our luthiers, we will cover how to identify & address the most common instrument problems and discuss the most frequently asked repair and adjustment questions.
    Strings, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Wayland

  77. Blended Learning with Your Ensemble- A New Way Forward
    Jim Frankel
    Does the idea of introducing technology to your ensemble evoke nightmarish visions of mountains of prep work, device incompatibility issues, and content creation? Software should maximize instruction time and make your job easier. We’ll introduce you to a single-sign-on platform, compatible across all devices which integrates seamlessly with your favorite software tools, includes curated content, and enables you to track student growth.
    Technology, Wed, 1:00-1:50, Weston

  78. An Unexpected Perk: Lessons in Score Study for Ensemble Musicians Post-COVID
    Michael Dolan
    While many (if not most) academic ensembles spent 2020-21 on Zoom or equivalent, directors came up with projects and activities to fill the semesters and provide a worthy ensemble-appropriate experience. One such idea was discussing score study for ensemble musicians, an activity directors hope is happening anyway but simply don’t usually have the opportunity in rehearsals to discuss in a formal, structured way. This presentation will provide concrete guidelines for how and why this might be included as a regular part of a high school or collegiate academic ensemble course in a variable-size assignment(s) outside of rehearsal.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Westborough

  79. Embodying Singing with Somatic Choral Pedagogy
    Stephen Paparo
    This interactive session will lead participants through an experiential approach to teach vocal technique and expressive singing in a choral setting. Somatic choral pedagogy focuses on first-person perception of the body through one's own proprioceptive senses as a means to embodied understanding of how to sing. Participants will learn short lessons, based on the Feldenkrais Method® of somatic education, that develop essential singing skills, such as posture, breathing, resonance, and articulation, that can be incorporated into warm-ups and repertoire rehearsal.
    Choral, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Southborough

  80. Composition Activities for General Music Students: Basic to Advanced
    Ruth Debrot
    Composing in middle school general music is an engaging way to teach musicals skills and independence. By composing, students learn to work collaboratively, think creatively, refine and revise ideas, and to reflect on their own work and the work of peers. By engaging in creative artistic processes, students develop critical thinking skills, aural skills, conceptual understandings, and the ability to express their ideas about the world in a personal and meaningful way. Happily, one need not be a composer to teach composition!
    Composition, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Sudbury

  81. Disengaging Teachings: Facing Down White Supremacy in Music Education
    Brian Gellerstein
    The tentacles of White supremacy are complex and persist throughout music education. Acknowledging White supremacy, recognizing it, and taking action against it are interrelated steps in a cyclical process. This session will provide a framework for music teachers to learn about, recognize, and challenge White supremacy within their content and practices. Through deliberate efforts to understand the context of White supremacy in music education, educators can begin to recognize the ways it shows up in classrooms.
    Innovations, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Boxborough

  82. MS/HS String Orchestra Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli
    This reading session will review the newest publications for Middle and High string orchestras. Come and bring your instrument to sight read music from medium easy orchestra music through advanced literature.
    Strings, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Wayland

  83. Cloud-Based Assessment on Any Device
    Jim Frankel
    Teachers are increasingly needing to assess student progress, but there isn't always a large budget. This session explores affordable tools for measuring students' performance, creativity & musicianship. Suitable for K-12 educators.
    Technology, Wed, 2:00-2:50, Weston

  84. Using Jazz to Teach Social Justice
    Tom Lizotte, Lisa Linde
    Recent events have made our students acutely aware of the need for social justice. The racial turmoil and fight for gender equity the country is experiencing now reflect issues that have roiled us since early in the 20th century. These issues have had a strong impact on jazz music. Whether in civil rights or gender equity, the music has reflected the social condition. Jazz provides rich potential for teaching moments, whether it is the unequal opportunities blacks suffered in jazz, the Harlem Renaissance, the protests in music and culture in the bebop movement or Charles Mingus' cries for help for the black community during the Civil Rights Movement. Jazz has also been slow to address gender inequity. From jazz' beginnings in the early 20th century until the 1960s women (other than singers) had few opportunities. This clinic will examine that problem and the recent progress.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 3:00-3:50, Westborough

  85. Teaching Beginning Vocal Improvisation
    Stephen Paparo
    This interactive session will lead participants through a beginning vocal improvisation curriculum that can be taught in person or via a virtual classroom with breakout rooms and any digital audio workstation (DAW). The curriculum, which can be adapted to any level and requires no prior knowledge, will include individual improvisation vocal warm ups, and paired improvisational conversations, and small-group mini-circle songs. The session will not include a DAW tutorial, but examples of student work will be shared.
    Choral, Wed, 3:00-3:50, Southborough

  86. Embracing the New Music Educator- Meet and Greet
    Veteran and new music educators welcome!
    Wed, 3:00-3:50, Sterling

  87. Teaching Music Literacy through the Guitar Elective: Reaching All Students
    Sarah Fard
    The guitar elective offers an introduction to music making for many students. The inclusive nature of the course offering often means that teachers see students from all backgrounds and abilities, including students with special needs. This presentation will offer participants an opportunity to look at the guitar curriculum through the lens of literacy- how is music visually represented to students? Participants will review the benefits and barriers of various existing notation systems for guitar (staff notation, tablature, and chord charts) as they apply to disabilities such as ASD, dyslexia, vision impairment, and more. A portion of the presentation will also be spent reviewing how to make these adaptations in music notation software- as well as a brand new plug-in for Finale, specifically designed for teaching guitar to students with special needs!
    Innovations, Wed, 3:00-3:50, Boxborough

  88. Website Design For Beginners: Building A Site for Your String Program
    Macullen Byham
    Have you ever wanted to design a website for your string program, but weren't sure where to start? This session is for you! We will explore a couple of different website builders and discuss why we would want to build a site, what we would put on it, and how to organize it in a way that is intuitive to the viewer. Please feel free to bring a device to try it out!
    Strings, Wed, 3:00-3:50, Wayland

  89. Customized Charts - Simple arranging strategies for jazz ensemble development
    Christopher Gagne
    This session will explore the various educational benefits of arranging repertoire for developing jazz ensembles. These benefits apply to all levels of instruction, but this discussion will focus specifically on grades 7-12. This session will offer some simple strategies for educators seeking ideas on how to start arranging for their ensembles, and will also cover some more creative approaches to jazz ensemble arranging for experienced directors as well.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 4:00-4:50, Westborough

  90. HS Choral Reading Session
    Andrew Scoglio, Kaitlin Donovan
    This session will present 10-15 pieces suitable for HS Choirs of various levels. A reading packet will be provided. Please come along and sing!
    Choral, Wed, 4:00-4:50, Southborough

  91. Teaching Young Percussionists: Fundamentals for Your Beginners
    David Wolf
    This clinic will focus on fundamental skills and concepts that are necessary to set up your young, budding percussionists with the information for their success, as well as yours as their teacher. Concepts related to Snare Drum and Mallet Percussion will be the focus. Topics to include equipment set up, grip, body position, stroke types, and tone production. This clinic is aimed at the elementary school beginning band director, but could be equally helpful for middle and high school directors as a review of important fundamental percussion concepts.
    Band/Jazz, Wed, 4:00-4:50, Sudbury

  92. MAJE Meeting, Wed, 5:00, Weston

Massachusetts Music Educators Association

MMEA logo

Michael LaCava
Interim Executive Director
PO Box 920004
Needham, MA 02492