Session Descriptions

  1. Songwriting and Composition Using Technology
    Steven Kirby, Berklee College of Music
    Demonstration of technologies and ways to use them to help teaching Songwriting and Composition, particularly in contemporary styles. The presentation will survey and demonstrate a number of effective and innovative apps and software platforms which promote learning about, and being creative with, music while also lending themselves to the learning and teaching of music theory. Demos will include sample assignments and student work. Though many of the concepts and applications will be adaptable and suitable to the entire K-12 spectrum, a majority of the examples will be targeted toward higher grade levels.
    Technology , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  2. Using New SmartMusic to Guide Student Deliberate Practice
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    Deliberate practice requires that teachers set specific goals, provide expert instruction and that their students have focused practice and receive immediate feedback. Teachers that use SmartMusic assignments and grading software are able to quickly learn what students know and what skills need more work. Come to this session and learn how Massachusetts music educators are using SmartMusic on computers, Chromebooks, and iPads to guide student practice and fulfill Student Learning Objectives while quickly and easily reporting and sharing quantitative student data
    Commercial , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  3. Ready, Set, Resources! General Music Materials
    Andy Beck, Alfred Music
    Sing, dance, play, and learn along with Andy Beck as he shares new and favorite resources designed especially for the general music classroom. From ready-to-go lesson plans, templates, and manipulatives to interactive white board software and complete performance programs, this session is overflowing with outstanding elementary music materials!
    Commercial , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  4. Everyone Plays: Visions for the Future
    Andrea Monty, Town of Boxford
    A panel of U.S. and Scottish educators with years of experience in the field will discuss music programs that can and DO give students with disabilities access to high quality music performance. Come learn how both traditional and adapted instrumentation, and new technology can help you design and implement a program for your students.
    General Interest , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  5. Social Justice in Music Education: Moving Beyond Just Conversation
    Shannon Ward-Leighton, Abby Kelley Foster Charter Public School
    The term “social justice” has come to mean many things in our society - but what does it mean for music education? Why should we, as music educators, be interested in this topic? How could it impact our practice? This session will focus on identifying social justice issues in music programs at all levels, and will include a collaborative group activity where participants and the presenter share ideas and strategies for tackling these issues in practice.
    Innovations , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  6. The World is Your Oyster! Building Cross-Curricular Connections through Folk Music and Movement
    Otto Gross, Quaver Music, Inc.
    Music is truly a universal language; one that can take students on a tour of the globe from the comfort of your music classroom. In this session, we’ll explore folk songs from cultures around the world, using movement, instruments, improvisation, and technology to extract solid cross-curricular connections in geography, history, and language - all while meeting your general music objectives. Participants will walk away with activities they can implement right away to create lessons that connect every corner of the school campus, and beyond!
    Commercial , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  7. General Music: A Case for Ukulele
    Andrea Cook, Worcester Public Schools; Meredith Lord, Worcester Public Schools
    In this session we’ll walk you through our homegrown ukulele curriculum and how we’ve changed middle school general music class from passive music appreciation to active music participation. You will have opportunities for hands-on learning and will be shown the steps needed to bring students through a successful ukulele playing unit. Though this curriculum was designed for middle school, it could easily be extended to upper elementary or high school. Bring your ukulele or use one of ours and get inspired!
    General Music , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  8. Welcome to Your New Classroom: Adjusting New Students to Your Classroom Mid-Year
    Christopher DiBenedetto, Revere Public Schools
    Students that feel safe, included. and welcome excel in your classroom, but how do you work through the challenges that come with acclimating a new student in your classroom in the middle of the school year? This session will deal with overcoming these challenges from pre-made welcome packages to empowering your own students to help bring these newest additions along.
    General Music , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  9. Let's Make One Thing Perfectly Clear: Common Conducting Problems and How to Fix Them
    David Rox, Gordon College
    Whether we are experienced or inexperienced conductors, many of us fall into a myriad of common traps that make our conducting gestures vague, misleading, and counterproductive. "When there is a mist on the podium, there is a fog in the ensemble." Conducting problems negatively impact rehearsal technique and our overall efficiency. This session will address some common physical conducting problems and how to remedy them, including body hinge points, beat size, podium presence, starting, stopping, and dealing with the "dreaded fermata."
    Band , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  10. Infusing Body Awareness and Wellness into the Choral Rehearsal
    Vimari Colón-León, Rockingham County
    Body awareness is fundamental to good singing. For that reason, a singer must be highly attuned to changes in his or her voice and body by adequately perceiving the movements involved. The purpose of this session is to discuss strategies for the development of body awareness and the promotion of a climate of health in the choral rehearsal. Principles from the Alexander Technique, Body Mapping, and Feldenkrais Method will be addressed. Participants will be empowered with knowledge needed to make informed choices in this context.
    Choral , Thurs, 8:00-9:00

  11. Google Apps for Education in the Music Classroom
    William Choe, Westfield Public Schools; Taryn Smith, Ludlow Public Schools
    If your school has adopted Google Apps for Education, the sheer amount of apps and options can be overwhelming. Come find out how you can use these powerful tools to both deliver instruction and create a Learning Management System that will streamline how you collect and assess student work from written responses to playing tests. We will cover Google Classroom, Google Sites and Google Chrome Extensions like Doctopus and Goobric.
    Technology , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  12. Integrate Improvisation and Ignite the Imagination
    Paul Barringer, Somerville Public Schools
    This session will focus on developing creative improvisation strategies in the elementary music classroom. Using folk songs and speech and movement materials, participants will discover ways to weave improvisation into every lesson as a natural part of learning music concepts. Learn to guide your students to become collaborative participants and active music makers at every step of the learning process. Come and explore the possibilities!
    General Music , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  13. Meet Me in the Middle: Choral Music for Middle School Voices
    Andy Beck, Alfred Music
    Join clinician Andy Beck as we sing through the best and most appropriate repertoire designed specifically for middle school singers. Music in this session will address your big concerns, like finding music for changing voices, balancing fun selections with educational repertoire, motivating teen singers, easy movement ideas, and more. A complimentary music packet will be given to each director in attendance.
    Commercial , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  14. We Are What We Program: The Importance of Repertoire Selection in the Music Curriculum
    Matthew Westgate, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    This session will focus on programming decisions and how they relate to musical tastes and music education philosophy, provide suggestions to develop a programming philosophy and a long-term repertoire plan, and discuss how to design concert programs that provide a healthy “balanced diet” of quality music that stimulates students’ minds, bodies, and souls. Helpful worksheets and lists of suggested repertoire/composers will be included.
    Band , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  15. Exploring the Educational Policy Landscape
    Lynn Tuttle, NAfME
    Join the discussion around how the educational policy landscape is influencing music education in Massachusetts. What federal, state and local policies are having an impact – for better or for worse? What’s expected on the horizon from the federal level and your state leaders? What role can you as a music educator play in influencing policy? While we won’t always have answers, we’ll engage in a great dialogue about the intersection of policy, education, government, and music-making.
    MMEA , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  16. Ukulele for Absolute Beginners: C, F, and G7
    Andrea Cook, Worcester Public Schools; Israel Saldana, Worcester Public Schools
    This session is recommended for anyone who has an interest in learning how to play the ukulele. Bring your own instrument or borrow one of ours and we'll walk you through your first chords, strumming patterns, and other basics. Great for elementary teachers who want to provide simple accompaniment for their classes or for middle and high school teachers who are considering offering ukulele clubs. Participants should expect to leave this session with the ability to play their first song on ukulele and resources in order to continue their newfound hobby.
    General Music , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  17. The "Bass"-ics of Bass
    Janet Haas, Lexington Public Schools
    This session will cover the basics of starting beginning bass players. The bass is unique in that it is not tuned like the other orchestral strings. The fingering system is different, and students must learn to shift earlier than their peers. Most string method books are violin-centric. The bass books are adapted with little thought for the big picture goals. In this session, we will discuss recruiting methods to build a good bass section, critical technical issues that may not be addressed in a method book, and using the bass as the "fun"damental of the orchestra.
    Strings , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  18. Everyone Plays: Progress with Figurenotes Notation
    Lauren Clay, Drake Music Scotland; Emma Lines, Drake Music Scotland
    Inclusive music practice doesn’t just benefit people with additional support needs; it benefits us all. Come and learn how to use Figurenotes, a Finnish educational tool, to further your pupils’ musical progression. From rhythm games to learning to play instruments, this hands-on session will enable you to support pupils that may have been discounted from music-making. Perfect for dyslexia and autism spectrum disorder, Figurenotes also brings a fresh way of learning music to mainstream pupils. Clear progression from the basics to reading standard notation. With Figurenotes, everyone can play.
    Commercial , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  19. Forum - All Things CAP!
    Cynthia Grammer, Berklee College of Music
    All current and prospective teacher supervisors and program supervisors are invited to join our forum. If you are thinking about mentoring a student teacher (teacher candidate), please consider attending and sharing your thoughts, questions, and concerns. We will discuss tips for success, pitfalls, and anything else that will assist us all in our efforts to give our future music teachers a terrific beginning.
    General Interest , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  20. Method to the Madness: Letting Students Select the Repertoire
    Katrina Abraham, Weymouth Public Schools; Kathleen Kenny, Weymouth Public Schools
    “Let your students pick the repertoire? You must be crazy!" Maybe! But, the National Core Arts Standards now includes the selection of art for presentation as an anchor standard. Don't worry, this doesn't mean you'll end up with a program of Justin Bieber arrangements (unless you're into that kind of thing). Spend some time with us to discuss processes for allowing students to participate in, and even lead, the selection of repertoire, and ways you can create a varied and appropriate program that addresses your curriculum for any ensemble and age group.
    Innovations , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  21. Berklee cNAfME Puerto Rico Trip: Teaching with a Multicultural Perspective
    Fabiola Mendez, Berklee College of Music; John Liner, Berklee College of Music
    Undergraduate Berklee students will present research findings from their cultural and educational exchange trip to Puerto Rico. During this week long trip, Music Education students explored the island's education system through teacher observation, mini-lessons, and clinics, specifically focusing on the approach and importance of music in Puerto Rican schools. This session will compare and contrast music education pedagogies in Puerto Rico versus the United States.
    General Interest , Thurs, 9:15-10:15

  22. Keynote - Envisioning What Music Education Can Be
    Dr. Constance McKoy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
    In this address, Connie McKoy challenges music educators to rethink what music education looks and sounds like, especially if we want to affirm the musical lives of all students and acknowledge their desire to use music as a means for personal and individual expression.
    MMEA , Thurs, 10:30-11:45

  23. Future of Music Technology: Web-Based Music Applications for Music Collaborative Process Part 2
    Chee-Ping Ho, Berklee College of Music; Gillian Desmarais, Berklee College of Music
    To establish and encourage the use of music technology with cloud-based tools among schools and artists. Participants use these synchronies to collaborate on creative projects with artists, schools, and beyond. Featuring recorded content with the following artists: Percussion: Taku Hirana - http://www.takupercussion.com, Alto Sax: Fabian Lim - https://www.selmer.fr/musicfiche.php?id=843, Vibraphone: Victor Mendoza - http://victormendoza.com, Guitar: Shun Ng - https://www.shunng.com.
    Technology , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  24. One, Two, Three! Children's Songs from Israel
    Martha Holmes, Newton Public Schools
    Secular counting songs, ball bouncing and jump rope chants, songs and games from Israel. Based on Rita Klinger's collection, this participatory workshop will demonstrate many of the songs from the recent OAKE publication "One, Two, Three!" (Achat, Shtayim, Shalosh!). Most of the games and songs are appropriate for preschool through grade 4. The book will be available at the workshop.
    General Music , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  25. Strategies for a Successful Rehearsal: Myelinating the Circuits
    Bud Woodruff, Retired Orchestra Director
    Running of a 'live' rehearsal with students from the Easton Middle School Chamber Orchestra (students in grades 6-8). Students will be premiering one of Bud Woodruff's pieces, 'Bears in the Moonlight', released by LudwigMasters this spring.
    Strings , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  26. Reaching Every Student: Strategies for Teaching Music Effectively to Students with Special Needs in Inclusion Settings
    Rhoda Bernard, Berklee College of Music
    As the population of young people with special needs continues to grow, music educators find themselves working with students whose learning needs and profiles present new challenges. This workshop addresses this need by providing direct experience with practical strategies for teaching students with special needs in inclusion settings. Participants will experience time-tested strategies for effective teaching of students with special needs, and they will learn how to transfer these strategies to music learning settings. They will also gain an understanding of some ways that established effective teaching strategies in music can be adapted for students with disabilities in inclusion settings.
    General Interest , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  27. Local Music Education Advocacy: Making a Difference for Music Education
    Lynn Tuttle, NAfME
    Join with your colleagues to discover advocacy strategies which will support your local school music needs. What strategies have been working for others in your state? What messaging works best with the stakeholders you are attempting to influence? How and when can policy strengthen your advocacy requests? Lynn will share out the updated NAfME local advocacy toolkit and help you develop an advocacy plan for your community.
    MMEA , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  28. The Culturally Relevant Choral Classroom (Tip: It's Not Just for Urban Schools!)
    Jason Holmes, Boston Children's Chorus
    What is culturally relevant teaching? What does it mean in the choral setting? In this session, we will explore the ideas and work of culturally relevant pedagogy, specifically as it applies to choral music. Additionally, we will examine our current practices, looking for ways in which we already teach in this manner and, of course, looking for opportunities to expand our pedagogy. Finally, we will discuss the merits of teaching in this manner as it applies to ALL populations, not just the "urban kids."
    Choral , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  29. MLT Lite
    Andy Mullen, Burlington Public Schools
    Many music teachers are intrigued by Gordon’s Music Learning Theory, but are often confounded and intimidated by all the rules, sequences, and new vocabulary. In this session, participants will receive ideas, tools, and techniques from MLT that can be immediately embraced, and used to enhance the musical understanding of their students. For those teachers who wish to wade in the shallow end, and would rather not “Jump Right In” the deep end, this session is for you.
    General Music , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  30. Getting the Best from the Teacher's Voice
    Kathryn Denney, Berlin Boylston Public Schools
    Do you ever get a sore throat after a long day of teaching? Has laryngitis ever interfered with your teaching? Learn tips from a 20-year veteran that will make your voice ready to teach 10 classes in a day, a singing rehearsal at night, and have animated phone conversations, and be ready for tomorrow!
    Choral , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  31. Education Policy and Advocacy- What Can We Do?
    John Mlynczak, Managing Director, Noteflight
    ESEA used to be nicknamed NCLB but is now ESSA with updates to Titles I-IV but no more core. More IMPORTANTLY, how do we teach more music to more students and advocate for music education in today’s policy landscape? John Mlynczak will break down education policy into an easy-to-understand manner and provide tools for advocating for music education.
    General Interest , Thurs, 12:00-1:00

  32. Exploring Finale Worksheets
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    This clinic explores the extensive ready-made educator approved content found in Finale Worksheets and its use in the classroom. Topics include flashcards, theory, ear training, fingerings, terminology, musical games, general music and how to create your own worksheet from “scratch”. Learn how to edit and customize Finale Worksheets to your area of teaching. In addition, explore Finale Repertoire public domain songs for instrumental, piano and vocal.
    Commercial , Thurs, 1:15-2:30

  33. Bucket Drumming Grades 4-12
    Eytan Wurman, Cambridge Public Schools
    Introductory session to show how bucket drumming can teach rhythm, improvisation, individual and group composition, ensemble performance and evaluation, and musicianship from grades 4-12 or even younger. Come make some noise and be creative with us!
    General Music , Thurs, 1:15-2:30

  34. Real Men Sing Real Repertoire: An A Cappella and Choral Reading Session
    James Brodeur, Xaverian Brothers High School
    A common battle cry in choral education has been “real men sing.” What better way to recruit men for your Chorus or a cappella group and cultivate their talent than programming awesome, accessible repertoire just for them? While there is not as much repertoire out there as for SATB and women’s voices, there is some really great music just waiting to be performed by our young men. During this session, participants will sing numerous a cappella and choral pieces for high school men; some pieces could be adapted for middle school. Repertoire lists and other resources will also be provided.
    Choral , Thurs, 1:15-2:30

  35. What's New for Middle School Choirs?: A Reading Session
    Brendan Ferrari, Lexington Public Schools
    Come sing through some newer works aimed at middle school choirs. A particular focus will be repertoire that is appropriate for the changing male voice.
    Choral , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  36. Everyone Plays: Music Technology - Introducing the Digital Orchestra
    Pete Sparkes, Drake Music Scotland
    Music technology can open up a whole world of possibilities for musicians who cannot access conventional instruments. Learning how to use it in a way that is creative, progressive and musical can be a challenge but well worth the effort. Pete will deliver a session with practical examples exploring some of the key technologies used by Drake Music Scotland. Pete will include video examples from recent projects to share his experiences of creating inclusive ensembles and establishing the world’s first Digital Orchestra in Scotland.
    Technology , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  37. Ukulele in the Music Classroom: Four Strings of Joy!
    Thomas Amoriello, Chair-Elect for the NAfME Council for Guitar Education
    Aloha! If images of palm trees come to mind when you hear the strumming of the ukulele, you are not alone! So why not include the "uke" in your teaching? Topics covered include: how to obtain ukuleles, history of the instrument, reading tablature as well as playing melodies and chords. Bring a uke!!!
    Innovations , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  38. If They Love Music, I've Done My Job!
    Janet Galván, Ithaca College
    In this session, Dr. Galván explores strategies in laying the foundation for students to want to be involved in choral music. She will explore why choice of repertoire and building vocal and rhythmic skills are crucial ingredients in getting students to love music. She will go over a variety of repertoire in this session.
    Choral , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  39. General Music Forum (placeholder)
    Sandra Doneski, Gordon College; Cathy Ward, Somerville Public Schools
    General Music Forum
    General Music , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  40. "I Went from Not Knowing to Understanding:" Effective Teaching in a Music Educator Preparation Program?
    Elissa Johnson-Green, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    Having spent most of my teaching career in K-8 music education, becoming a teacher educator brought a new set of challenges. The most pressing of these: How can we effectively transfer years of classroom teaching experience as working knowledge? How can we give students a "real" sense of teaching within a purposefully structured learning context (pre-practicum)? How do we develop future music educators with grit and staying power? I will present my own approach to these questions and then will open group discussion. Ideas will be recorded and then later shared as a strategies reference.
    General Interest , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  41. String Orchestra New Music Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli, Weston Public Schools
    This reading session will review the newest publications for string orchestra. Come and bring your instrument to sight read everything from beginning orchestra music through advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of Johnson String Instrument.
    Strings , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  42. Affirming Students' Musical LIves: Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Music Classroom
    Connie McKoy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
    The purpose of this interactive presentation is to explore how music teachers can acknowledge the ways of musical knowing that students bring to the music classroom and use that knowledge as a bridge to new musical understandings.
    MMEA , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  43. Effective Techniques for Rehearsing the Jazz Ensemble
    Sebastian Bonaiuto, Boston College
    As we progress through our teaching careers, we find ways to approach ensemble rehearsals that achieve "success." We develop rehearsal techniques through experience, trial and error, observing successful teachers and artists, attending seminars, workshops and clinics and through discussions with colleagues. Every director defines "success" in ways that are relevant and appropriate to his/her goals and teaching philosophy as well as the human and physical resources available to that director. There are, however, some "best practices" that every director should employ. This session presents one educator's distillation of over 30 years’ experience rehearsing jazz ensembles. Each technique is presented with commentary on the efficacy of the technique, when it is appropriate and what one can achieve through the use of each technique. Topics such as the director's responsibilities and preparation will also be covered.
    Band , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  44. Musicking in Vietnamese Orphanage: MA Music Teachers Learn Heartwork of Artwork
    Kinh Vu, Boston University
    Professional development (PD) for in-service music educators oftentimes is deemed irrelevant to the many facets of teaching and learning in general and ensemble music. While teacher PD is sometimes necessary to reinforce, sustain, and invent school- or system-wide protocols, the topics often leave music teachers wondering how these exercises will encourage personal reflection, thoughtfulness, or innovation regarding their musical practices and expertise. During this session, two Massachusetts band directors and a university professor will share how their self-designed professional development in a Vietnamese orphanage informed their pedagogies as music educators in the Boston metropolitan region.
    Innovations , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  45. The New Graduate - Now What?
    Craig Robbins, Harvard Public Schools; Heather Formon, Pembroke Public Schools
    I am about to finish college or am looking to switch jobs after just beginning my formal teaching career, now what? Come join us to discuss the vast world of opportunities in K-12 music education. In this open discussion forum we will pose questions and speak to the following topics: preparing your personal portfolio, job searching and where to look/apply, how to best prepare yourself for an interview, getting the job, required versus implied details of the job, first-year teacher blues, and many more!
    General Interest , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  46. Social Justice Issues in Music Education
    Libby Allison, Berklee College of Music
    Join us for a discussion about social justice issues in music education. This two-hour session will focus on issues related to race and ethnic identity including how we serve students from diverse backgrounds, looking at gender in our classrooms (including addressing the unique needs of transgender youth), and how socio-economic issues impact access to music education.
    Innovations , Thurs, 2:45-3:45

  47. High School Choral Reading Session
    Kirk Averitt, Beaver Country Day School; Sean Landers, Belmont Public Schools
    This reading session will include dependable selections for all your high school ensembles. We will highlight new selections in the repertoire for SATB, SSA and TTB choir.
    Choral , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  48. Live Sound Basics for Music Teachers
    Sean Bilodeau, Holliston Public Schools
    This workshop is designed to give music teachers at any grade level the basics of running sound for a performance. Topics include miking, use of a mixing board, and essential accessories. No prior knowledge needed!
    Technology , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  49. Multicultural Musical Role Models: Inspiring Diverse Students through Engaged Listening
    Adam Epstein, Cambridge Public Schools
    In our increasingly diverse and inclusive nation, how can we inspire all our students to continue making music independently throughout their lives if we do not expose them to musical role models with whom they can identify? This session will explore the “Musician of the Month” listening framework which presents a balance of genders, musical styles, and cultures throughout each academic year. The presenter will share successful strategies for implementing this approach across all grade levels, preK-12. Participants will be challenged to consider their own musical heritage, the musical heritages of their students, and an expanded definition of “art music.”
    General Music , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  50. Kodaly Pedagogy in the Choral Rehearsal
    Beth Anne Young, Middleboro Public Schools
    In this session, participants will come away with tools and resources to help them implement the use of Kodaly Pedagogy in the Choral Rehearsal. We will explore how to use and plan rehearsals using the three P's of Kodaly, Prepare, Present and Practice in the Choral Classroom/Rehearsal. This will be an active session where participants will sing, dance and experience a Kodaly-inspired Choral Rehearsal.
    Choral , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  51. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the Music Classroom
    Alice Hammel, James Madison University
    Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience the world differently in the areas of socialization, communication, and cognition. Because of these differences, they often need accommodations and modifications in the music classroom. As part of this session, many ideas for adapting the environment will be introduced and reinforced. This session is active and inherently engaging.
    General Interest , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  52. Playing the Long Game: Planning Beyond Beginning Band with Your Beginning Brass Students
    Jason Sulliman, Troy University (Troy, AL)
    We often teach our beginning brass students how to be successful at beginning-level repertoire. Will their success scale up to middle school? High school? College? We often leave that responsibility to the next teacher or school, however, several recent developments in scientific research suggest that the specific way that we start our students will have a profound impact on their success later on. I will discuss common strategies with beginning bands and showcase potential limitations with common pedagogy. I will introduce specific and applicable tips for beginning band educators that will help prepare young brass players for long-term success.
    Band , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  53. String Orchestra New Music Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli, Weston Public Schools
    This reading session will review the newest publications for string orchestra. Come and bring your instrument to sight read everything from beginning orchestra music through advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of Johnson String Instrument.
    Strings , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  54. Spirituals, Gospel, and More! How To Teach & Perform Music of the African Diaspora
    John Liner, Berklee College of Music; Odell Zeigler, Berklee College of Music
    From choosing repertoire to making your group sound authentic, this interactive session is for you! Watch, listen, and sing along as the clinicians give proven techniques and recommendations to make your band, choir, or orchestra sound genuine. Not only will you be armed with the tools to sound authentic, but you will also have new ways to teach the history and culture behind the music of the African Diaspora.
    Innovations , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  55. Celebrating Graduate Student Research: New Perspectives on Research.
    Tawnya Smith, Boston University; Tavis Linsin, Boston University
    Join this session to learn the new and exciting areas that graduate student researchers are focusing upon in music education. Participants will share a short description of the purpose and findings of their studies, and then discuss the implications for music education practice. Take away exciting new insights for your teaching practice.
    General Interest , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  56. Selfish Software: Harnessing Technology to Increase Livelihood
    Chris Clark, Southern Berkshire Regional School District
    New technology is developed quickly, and keeping track of new products can be overwhelming. This session will provide an overview of software, technology, and apps to assist choir directors in managing both their choirs and their own musical life. Participants will see these programs at work in real time, and hear about how they can be utilized to reduce stress and increase productivity. A range of software will be discussed, such as streaming music services, RSS feeds, choir managing programs, and task managers. This session is great for anyone who wants a crash course in technology-assisted living.
    Technology , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  57. Getting a Running Start on Your Music Education Career
    Markeise Russell, Chicago Public Schools
    Markeise Russell is a graduate of the prestigious Berklee College of Music and currently serves as the Band Director and Lead Music Educator at Nicholas Senn High School in Chicago, IL. The 2018 Grammy Music Educator of the Year quarterfinalist is excited to share some of the most important lessons he’s learned in the field. Mr. Russell will cover topics including securing job offers, curriculum design, starting/taking over a music program, building relationships, building a professional reputation, getting administration on your side, drafting strong proposals, raising money, teacher evaluation, self-care, and more. Don’t start your career without attending this session!
    General Interest , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  58. Social Justice Issues in Music Education
    Libby Allison, Berklee College of Music
    Join us for a discussion about social justice issues in music education. This two-hour session will focus on issues related to race and ethnic identity including how we serve students from diverse backgrounds, looking at gender in our classrooms (including addressing the unique needs of transgender youth), and how socio-economic issues impact access to music education.
    Innovations , Thurs, 4:00-5:00

  59. Developing the Voice with a Future
    Janet Galván, Ithaca College
    In this session, Dr. Galvan, will address building vocal skills in elementary classrooms and choral ensembles. She will include ideas on warm-ups, working diction with elementary students, and creative strategies to build vocal skills. Music will be provided to demonstrate ideas.
    Choral , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  60. Wonderful, Worthwhile Websites for the Music Educator
    James Brodeur, Xaverian Brothers High School
    Websites can be such a valuable resource for us and our students. This session will explore practical applications for specific websites in the music program including but not limited to: assignment submission, aural skills assessments, calendars, class pages, electronic worksheets, free music, notation, pitch matching, planbooks, projects (e.g. film scoring, translation), sharing recordings, sight reading, and volunteer organization. Participants are kindly asked to bring a laptop or tablet so they can join in demonstrations and explore websites.
    Technology , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  61. Spiral of Songs: Teaching Repertoire Across Grade Levels
    Adam Epstein, Cambridge Public Schools
    "A good song is like an old friend--always there when you need it," a colleague once quipped to me. This is true in a social/emotional/cultural sense as well as in a curricular sense. Songs enjoyed in earlier grades can be revisited again and again in later years to prepare, present, and practice various musical concepts. This session will explore the power of long-range, Kodaly-inspired curricular planning. Effective methods for teaching repertoire across multiple grade levels will also be demonstrated.
    General Music , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  62. Music Literacy Games and Activities
    Rachel Gibson, Westfield State University
    Come engage in a variety of rhythmic and melodic practice activities suitable for the elementary music classroom and beyond. Each game fosters musical development in fun and stimulating contexts and addresses several areas of the music curriculum including sight-reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation. Promote music literacy in your classroom with creative and enjoyable activities!
    General Music , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  63. Exploring the Educational Policy Landscape
    Lynn Tuttle, NAfME
    Join the discussion around how the educational policy landscape is influencing music education in Massachusetts. What federal, state and local policies are having an impact – for better or for worse? What’s expected on the horizon from the federal level and your state leaders? What role can you as a music educator play in influencing policy? While we won’t always have answers, we’ll engage in a great dialogue about the intersection of policy, education, government, and music-making.
    MMEA , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  64. Time to Let Go: Moving Responsibility from the Podium to the Ensemble
    Mark Stickney, Plymouth State University
    We conductors need to be confident and secure enough to let go of some of what we do. It is time to give more responsibility to our ensembles, and teach our students how to create with our guidance and not by just doing what we tell them to do. This session will discuss teaching methods that help the students take responsibility for their creative process in a concert band setting.
    Band , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  65. Incorporating the Guitar into Your School Music Program
    Thomas Amoriello, Chair-Elect for the NAfME Council for Guitar Education
    The objective of this workshop is to advise music educators about the benefits of starting a guitar program. The popularity of the guitar is a great tool to reach those students not currently involved in an arts program. Equipment, lesson plan ideas and more will be presented.
    Innovations , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  66. Your Elementary Choral Toolkit: Technique, Technology, and Transformation!
    Otto Gross, Quaver Music, Inc.
    Discover exciting new techniques for developing vocal independence in your students through a combination of solid pedagogy and the integration of engaging technology! Unpack a variety of folk songs, partner songs, canons and walk away with a printed Octavo and sample access to adaptable rehearsal tools you can use in your classroom right away from the engaging and educational world of QuaverMusic.com. Quaver Choral Resources equip Elementary Music Specialists to cover a vast breadth of musical concepts, vocal techniques, and transferable skills to take their singers into middle school and beyond!
    Commercial , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  67. Tried and True Techniques, A Guided Roundtable for String Teachers, Year 2
    Colleen MacDonald, Weston Public Schools; Whitney Tandon, Wayland Public Schools
    Tried and True Techniques for the String Educator, Year 2 is a continuation of the 2017 Roundtable Discussion for String Teachers. In year one we discussed techniques used for teaching position, overall technique, vibrato and shifting. The attendees were actively involved in a sharing session of tried and true techniques that worked in their classrooms and asked to continue the discussion in 2018. The goal for 2018 is to cover topics such as recruitment and retention, assessment, rehearsal techniques, go-to warm-ups and repertoire favorites.
    Strings , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  68. I Have to Do What?! What I Wish I Knew Then
    Douglas McCall, Auburn Enlarged City School District
    This session will look at the first year of teaching and offer 10 tips/techniques for easing the transition from student to teacher. The presenter will reflect on his own first year of teaching at two separate buildings to guide the audience through this session. There will be a time at the end to ask questions.
    General Interest , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  69. Teaching Psychology and Sociology of Music
    Laura Lamore, Nashoba Valley Technical High School
    Students increasingly need and want to understand how music shapes who they are as people. Psychology and Sociology are an amazing gateway to show students the why behind the music that means so much to them. This session will explore major components of a year-long curriculum that introduces students to concepts of psych and sociology in music. Educators will leave with lessons that can be adapted to different age groups as well as tips on how to teach this sometimes sensitive subject. This subject matter can open up students to more deeply explore who they are!
    Innovations , Fri, 8:00-9:00

  70. Last Rites Reading Session
    Joseph Wright, Andover Public Schools; Matt Sexauer, Chelmsford Public Schools
    Do you have a lot of music filling your file cabinets that you know you will NEVER USE with your band? But do you feel kind of bad throwing it away or recycling it, especially if you've never heard it before? If so, the Last Rites Reading Session is for you! Bring along something from your library that you just want to hear once before we send it off with the recycling truck. Or who knows, maybe you'll find your new favorite band piece that you never knew existed. Most importantly, BRING YOUR INSTRUMENT and get ready to laugh a lot as we play through some of the junk that's been filling our file cabinets for decades.
    Band , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  71. Music Technology: An Intuitive and Inclusive Pathway for Teens with ASD
    Gena Greher, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    Music technology by its very nature encompasses multiple modalities as entry points for students, and presents many more possibilities for non-traditional learners to connect with their inner musical selves. Many music teachers are often unprepared for the challenges of working with non-traditional music learners. This presentation focuses on the use of music technology such as iPads, for its user-friendly and collaborative interface for working with teens on the autism spectrum, allowing them to explore their natural interest in music. This program allows these students to explore their natural interest in music listening, music making and technology in a social setting.
    Technology , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  72. Affirming Students' Musical LIves: Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Music Classroom
    Connie McKoy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
    The purpose of this interactive presentation is to explore how music teachers can acknowledge the ways of musical knowing that students bring to the music classroom and use that knowledge as a bridge to new musical understandings.
    MMEA , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  73. Treble Treasures Choral Reading Session
    Faith Lueth, Berklee College of Music
    This Treble voice reading session will present a wide variety of treble music that can be used in several settings and levels. The session will include a variety of genres, pedagogical value, and conducting approaches to enhance musicality and learning, as well as ways to adapt some literature to other voicings when needed. Attendees will receive a packet of music.
    Choral , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  74. Why Can't They Just Sit Still and Listen: ADHD Myths and Realities
    Alice Hammel, James Madison University
    Students with ADHD often struggle with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity. These differences can conflict with the goals of a music classroom. This session is designed to provide specific information regarding ADHD - separating myth from reality - and to provide classroom-tested and real life solutions to create a more effective learning environment for all who share a classroom with someone who has ADHD. This session is fast paced and a lot of fun.
    General Interest , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  75. Empowering LGBTQ Music Students and Teacher
    Stephen Paparo, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Virginia Bailey, Auburn Public Schools
    This session is for anyone interested in learning more about how to best meet the needs of their LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning) students. The presenters will suggest how music educators can become “safe people” by providing research-based findings regarding LGBTQ perspectives on music teaching and learning as well as practical strategies for the classroom and rehearsal. There will also be an opportunity for attendees to share their successes and challenges. Ultimately, the music classroom can be a place where students–regardless of their gender and sexual identities–can express themselves in ways that enrich music education for all.
    General Interest , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  76. Guitar Ensemble Workshop for the Music Educator (Grades 6-12)
    Thomas Amoriello, Chair-Elect for the NAfME Council for Guitar Education
    This is an opportunity for music educators to gather and discuss what is involved with starting a beginner guitar ensemble in their school. Topics include useful guitar ensemble publications, and standards related to the current state of guitar ensemble instruction. Participants are encouraged to bring a nylon string classical guitar, adjustable footstool in addition to publications they wish to share with other educators. Educators with no previous knowledge in this area are also encouraged to attend.
    Innovations , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  77. Everyone Plays - Celebrating Inclusion in Scotland: Practical Ideas for Inclusion
    Julie McKenzie, Charity - musicALL, Glasgow, Scotland; Joni Lindsay, Hazelwood School, Glasgow, Scotland
    Everyone can make music together! This practical session will focus on inclusive music making. There will be lots of fun ideas for interactive singing, lively movement games and energetic samba drumming. The session will demonstrate how using music to focus on ability, not disability, breaks down barriers, promotes inclusion, changes perceptions and benefits everybody!
    Innovations , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  78. A Quick Introduction to the Takadimi Rhythm System
    Michael Driscoll, Brookline Public Schools
    Have you heard about the Takadimi rhythm system and want to know more? Or perhaps you want to try using Takadimi syllables in your class, but you don’t feel comfortable enough with the syllables? In this session you will experience the Takadimi rhythm system through a ‘sound before sight’ approach. You will become the student, feeling, hearing, and imitating rhythmic patterns before being introduced to the symbols that represent those sounds. Various permutations of rhythm patterns in simple and compound meters will be introduced as well as a shorthand rhythm notation method for use in rhythm dictation.
    General Music , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  79. Social Media Support Groups: When to Comment, When to Validate, and When to Just Read
    Bud Woodruff, Retired Orchestra Director
    Social Media Support Groups, like 'School Orchestra and String Teachers' on Facebook, can be quite helpful to even seasoned veteran teachers. But along with the helpful hints offered, can come unwise advice, too. We will investigate how to use these groups to your advantage.
    Strings , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  80. Supporting English Language Learners in the General Music Class
    Vimari Colón-León, Rockingham County
    Working with young English Language Learners (ELLs) presents a unique set of challenges. In order to achieve the highest level of success in the music classroom, it's important to acknowledge these and understand how they affect student learning. In addition, it is vital to know specific strategies that work effectively in this context. If you want to reach ELL students and help them be creative and successful, this session is for you!
    General Music , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  81. Towards a More Inclusive Music Education: Experiences of LGBTQQIAA Students in Music Education Programs Across Pennsylvania
    Eddie Holmes, Student, Gettysburg College; Brent Talbot, Assoc. Professor, Gettysburg College
    This undergraduate research project used Kumashiro’s (2000) theory of anti-oppressive education, this research examines the experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, Ally (LGBTQQIAA) students in higher education institutions across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Two questions guide this research: (1) What particular socio-cultural, environmental, and/or curricular practices lend themselves to LGBTQQIAA inclusion and safety among students, faculty, and staff? (2) In what ways do students, faculty, and staff who identify as LGBTQQIAA actively create and foster inclusive and supportive environments for music learning? Data was collected through an anonymous online survey distributed to students in music education programs across Pennsylvania.
    General Interest , Fri, 9:15-10:15

  82. You Have the Newest Finale but Are You Using It like Finale 2000?
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    Are you using the latest time saving Finale tools when creating musical arrangements, compositions and classroom materials? Learn how to update older files in order to take advantage of new feature that have been added since 2000. Learn the quickest ways to enter articulations, expressions, repeats, endings, lyrics and rehearsal marks. Use the Selection tool and contextual menus to reduce your editing time. No extracting parts needed with Finale’s linked parts! Choose from over 1,000 ready-made worksheets to use in your classroom, or customize them using your own content. Create student practice files and assignments for SmartMusic classic or the new web-based SmartMusic.
    Commercial , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  83. The Beauty of Practice: Creating Joyful and Literate Musicians in Cambridge Public Schools
    Kathryn Bach, Cambridge Public Schools
    In this demonstration, participants will see a group of second grade students from the Peabody School of Cambridge Public Schools. Students will be led in a 30-40 minute music lesson where they will be singing, reading from the staff, playing, and practicing. Transitions, part-work and advanced practice of the pentatonic scale will be showcased in this demonstration. One of the goals of this program is to develop musically literate and independent musicians through joyful music making experiences. Students at the Peabody School have instruction four times weekly for 30-minute blocks beginning in Junior Kindergarten based on the philosophy of Zoltán Kodály. The Peabody School is one of the first public schools in Cambridge to pilot this model of instruction. Musical frequency in early elementary based on Kodály-inspired instruction has been researched extensively by Dr. Martin Gardiner of Brown University for its cognitive and social-emotional benefits for young children. With the generous support of a grant to pilot this program over twenty years ago, Cambridge Public Schools continues to build this model into all of their elementary schools. I believe this kind of social justice that is happening in Cambridge, where students of a varied socio-economic and cultural background can all have this type of rigorous and quality of instruction, supports and reflects MMEA’s mission to 'support comprehensive, quality music instruction for all students.'
    General Music , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  84. The Use of Movement with Elementary Singers
    Janet Galván, Ithaca College
    In this session, Dr. Galván, will involve the participants in movement activities to support vocal skills, musical understandings, artistry, and leading students to “ownership” of the music. Music will be provided to demonstrate ideas.
    Choral , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  85. Assessing Students Who Learn Differently
    Alice Hammel, James Madison University
    Students who learn differently often need individualized goals, objectives, and assessment strategies. Through careful sequencing and winding of our goals, both to meet the needs of students who struggle to meet our goals and to meet the needs of students who have skills that far surpass our expectations, we can meet the needs of all students within our inclusion classrooms. This session is active and inherently engaging.
    General Interest , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  86. Music Prepares Students for Future Success
    John Mlynczak, Managing Director, Noteflight
    Through my career in music education and the music industry, the most successful people I meet are former music students. There is an abundant amount of research that demonstrates this, but nothing as powerful as personal stories. This session will explore the many life lessons we learn through music and will include open dialogue on the benefits of music education and how to advocate for our programs. Come to inspire and be inspired!
    General Interest , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  87. Fostering Diversity in Our Choral Ensembles Through Engagement in Our School Community and Repertoire Selection
    Felicia Barber, Westfield State University
    This session will focus on ways that teachers may encourage diversity within their ensembles specifically with recruiting and engagement in cross curricular activities, as well as diverse repertoire. The session hopes to give teachers practical strategies for the classroom as well as a sample reading packet of repertoire that will strive to highlight underrepresented cultures, styles, and composers.
    Choral , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  88. Arranging and Performing Pop Songs to Promote Lifelong Learning and to Teach Music Theory
    Nathan Cohen, Rockport Public Schools and Endicott College
    Students thrive on making their own decisions. Having students arrange pop music puts them in control of their repertoire, the elements of music, and the rehearsal process. Music theory becomes relevant to the students as they learn skills to make music with each other beyond the scope of the classroom. This session explores methods to facilitate this process and to equip the teacher to act as coach while giving students the freedom to develop musical independence.
    Innovations , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  89. Why Don't They Know That?
    Heather Kirby, Dedham Public Schools
    Some questions we may ask our students seem straight forward enough, "What meter is this piece?" "What is the resting tone?" "Is this song major or minor?" We are perplexed when they don't know the answers until we realize we have neglected to provide the necessary readiness for students to make these kinds of inferences. This session will present readiness activities and ideas for bridging students from rote learning to inference learning, where they strengthen their independent musicianship.
    General Music , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  90. Unified Approach for Band 5-12.
    Craig Hay, Hopkinton Public Schools
    This session will explain the unified approach to band in the Hopkinton School District. We will discuss scheduling, team teaching and collaboration from an elementary, middle school and high school perspective.
    Band , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  91. Decoding the Double Bass: What to Do with a Giant Cello in Your Ensemble!
    David Casali, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    The bass often seems fly under the radar in school ensembles. Few educators have had hands-on experience with the double bass and it can seem like a mysterious instrument at times. We will explore many facets of the bass including: the postural and physical elements that go into playing the bass properly, common mistakes made by beginning students, how to simplify cello parts properly to make them playable on the bass, how to direct your students to selecting the right type of bow for their body type and which aspects of bass technique differentiate it from the cello.
    Strings , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  92. Embracing Your First Job: Strategies to Be Successful after Graduation, Regardless of the Situation
    Matthew Talbert, Ohio University
    Accepting your first job as a recent college graduate is an exciting time, but is often accompanied with feelings of anxiousness and apprehension. The purpose of this session is to provide pre-service teachers with strategies and ideas to help them be more prepared for the possible situations they may encounter as they begin their career as a music educator.
    General Interest , Fri, 12:30-1:30

  93. Retaining the Tech-Savvy Generation
    John Mlynczak, Managing Director, Noteflight
    Students today are highly engaged with technology, both at home and in school. How do we utilize technology to recruit and retain music students in band programs? John Mlynczak will discuss current trends in student technology, demonstrate how to seamlessly integrate music technology lessons into a music class at any level, and provide a range of solutions for utilizing technology to increase student engagement and retention.
    Commercial , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  94. African Drumming and Dancing
    Julius Torgboh, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana
    The basic drum and dance techniques in African traditional music
    General Music , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  95. American Song: How Jazz Choir Enhances the School Choral Program
    Kevin McDonald, Wellesley Public Schools
    Vocal jazz plays an important part in the history of jazz and its cultural growth as America’s music. However, this music is frequently neglected in the development of a school choral curriculum, and as a result, school choral programs may be missing out on a genre of music that can instill energy, enthusiasm, improvisation, musical excellence, and a thirst for knowledge in their students. Come explore how the inclusion of vocal jazz may enhance your school choral program.
    Choral , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  96. What's the Big Idea?: A Workshop for Innovative Thinkers in Music Education
    Josef Hanson, University of Massachusetts Boston
    In this interactive session, participants will discover how to energize their careers and the music scenes at their schools by thinking like entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurship is not just for millionaires— it’s a process of transforming ideas into economic, social, or artistic value. Learn how to recognize musical opportunities, utilize existing resources in new ways, and grow unconventional initiatives in light of student needs and personal passions. Participants will engage in a "venture challenge" for a new musical endeavor of interest: perhaps a musical collaboration, curricular project, student-run enterprise, or alternative ensemble.
    Innovations , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  1. Getting Your Jazz Students to Hear it All!
    David Schumacher, Pentucket Regional School District
    Ear training is the elephant in the room for many directors, and an underdeveloped thread in their curriculum. But for the serious jazz student, a thorough ear training sequence is essential. I've completed a pilot program that tied into my educator evaluation cycle and integrated DDM's that facilitated personal meaning and independence for my students. They went from hearing major and minor triads, to transcribing without a reference instrument. I will focus on how to implement the curriculum, and illustrate the practical results. For directors of all experience levels. Embrace the challenge and get your students hearing it all!
    Band , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  2. Projects for Every Process: Encouraging Students to Create, Perform, Respond AND Connect
    Otto Gross, Quaver Music, Inc.
    Create, Perform, Respond, and Connect are the foundation of any music class. Creating simple projects that can be assessed in these four artistic processes can be challenging and time consuming. This workshop will demonstrate great project ideas that are fun, time-saving, and easy to assess. Get a head start on this week’s lesson planning with tangible tips and sample access to resources you can use right away!
    Commercial , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  3. Research for Practice: A Working Partnership
    Tawnya Smith, Boston University
    In this session, a panel of area music education researchers will solicit the ideas and suggestions of teachers to identify possible research/practice partnerships in the state, as well as identify the research areas that area teachers are most interested. Please bring your ideas, questions, and curiosities and share them in what we hope will be an exciting conversation about the future of music education in the state. We hope that the ideas generated will inform future research sessions at upcoming MMEA conferences and will create new synergies between teachers and researchers that will lead to powerful advancements in our profession.
    General Interest , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  4. Help with Your Color Guard. How to Build a Guard You and Your Students Will Love
    Christine Sirard, University of Massachusetts
    Information on building a color guard program in middle and high school. Geared toward non-competitive programs or those looking to start competing. How to find an instructor, build student leadership, find costumes and equipment. Basic overview of terminology and similarities/differences to marching instrumentalists. Q&A for anything you ever wanted to ask about color guard.
    Band , Fri, 1:45-3:00

  5. The Three Rs: Achieving Choral Excellence through Rehearsal, Repertoire, and Re-evaluation
    Frank Van Atta, The Brimmer and May School
    Attendees will explore many methods to enhance the structure of their ensembles to achieve choral excellence. It will include repertoire for middle and high school choral ensembles, as well as tools for applying these pieces to every type of ensemble. Furthermore, attendees will explore how to structure their own ensemble system in a way that offers each student a place to experience success. This includes methods to engage students in leadership positions, establishing cost-effective performance opportunities in the community, and ideas for expanding ensemble offerings.
    Choral , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  6. Using SmartMusic as a Resource for Differentiation
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    Learn how to use SmartMusic to design lessons based on students’ learning styles and easily tailor instruction to meet individual needs. With SmartMusic, students can be assessed on an on-going basis so that teaching, and indeed the other methods of differentiation, can be continuously adjusted according to the learners’ needs.
    Commercial , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  7. Puerto Rican Singing Games and Rhymes for the Music Classroom
    Vimari Colón-León, Rockingham County
    Singing games are a great way to teach musical ideas, incorporate movement, and give children an opportunity to connect with their cultural heritage, as well as the cultures of others. In this session, you’ll participate, and have fun learning about how to incorporate children’s games from Puerto Rico in your classroom. The talk will also emphasize the possibilities of these songs of being used to teach Kodaly-inspired concepts.
    General Music , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  8. Think, Sing, and Swing!!! Vocal Jazz Repertoire Selection and Reading Session
    Kevin McDonald, Wellesley Public Schools
    Embrace America's music by exploring useful topics associated with vocal jazz repertoire selection and joining the Wellesley High School Rice Street Singers in the performance of suggested vocal jazz charts. This session will present useful information on approaching the various jazz styles of swing, latin, ballad, and a cappella music for your ensemble.
    Choral , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  9. VOICES 21C: Developing Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Empowering Choral Music
    Ruth Debrot, Boston University and The Sharon Public Schools; Andre de Quadros, Boston University
    VOICES 21C, a choir under the artistic direction of Professor André de Quadros from Boston University, is aligned with humanist ideals of global understanding, compassion, inclusion, love, and non-violence. Comprised of a diverse group of singers, mainly from the northeast region of the United States who have dedicated themselves to these ideals, the musicians of VOICES 21C engage in egalitarian-based interdisciplinary artistic processes comprised of the spoken word, creative movement and body imagery, traditional Western classical music, non-traditional world music, and improvisation. The group’s recent tour of Israel and Palestine inspired a research project that prompted the members of VOICES 21C to reconsider their identities as American citizens, music educators and artists/musicians. Members of the choir will talk about what they learned by engaging with members of “Combatants for Peace,” singing with Israeli and Palestinian choral groups, working with Palestinian children in the West Bank and Galilee, and interacting with citizens who live daily amidst the ongoing struggles that characterize the region. The session will highlight transformational, educative, and musical practices of VOICES 21C, whose pedagogical approach is centered on a unique open-ended creative process. Of particular importance is the [humanist] philosophy of Orff-Schulwerk, which emphasizes the importance of the students’ contribution to the musical process and product. Join artistic director André de Quadros, researcher Ruth Debrot and members of the ensemble as they explore new possibilities for developing greater human understanding through choral music education, and as they examine the potential for transfer of this process to other educational and artistic contexts.
    MMEA , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  10. Building Confidence and Character: Student Mentoring in the Elementary Instrumental Classroom
    Allison Penn, Needham Public Schools
    The first few years learning an instrument are considered to be the launching point for future participation in ensembles. There is also potential to develop leadership skills and further peer relationships across grade levels. Having a peer model one grade level ahead can provide increased musical and social interaction. Mrs. Penn will share her experience with the mentoring program at Newman Elementary, which she co-created with her students, that benefits both the beginning and advanced learners in her before-school band. This session will include opportunities for creatively collaborating and sharing best practices.
    Band , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  11. Music Technology Resources for the Secondary General Music Classroom
    Virginia Bailey, Auburn Public Schools
    Are you tired of teaching the same old music appreciation class? Are you struggling to connect with your general music students who don't play an instrument? Come learn how to construct units and/or courses in Audio Recording, EDM/Hip Hop/Pop Songwriting, Film Scoring, and Game Audio and reenergize your Music Theory and other elective music courses. Easy to learn/use options for 1:1 devices and computer lab stations will be explored along with free and low-cost software and equipment.
    Technology , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  12. The EcoSonic Playground: An Immersive, Music Focused, STEAM Integrated, Environmentally Conscious, Inquiry Based Community Project – Development and Research
    Elissa Johnson-Green, University of Massachusetts Lowell
    The EcoSonic (sustainability/sound) Playground project develops interdisciplinary STEAM curriculum and sustainability awareness through music education. Using an architecture, design, and engineering focused curriculum, elementary aged children build indoor large-scale, musical instrument play structures with majority reusable materials. Students then use their own instrument creations as the basis for a comprehensive music curriculum focused on improvisation and composition. This project has been piloted with three different educational programs in the City of Lowell. Outcomes of initial research, impact on student learning, and applications for wider music curriculum will be presented.
    General Interest , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  13. Urban Music Forum
    Tom Westmoreland, Lynnfield Public Schools
    The Innovations Council will host a sharing session and discuss issues unique to working with music students in urban schools. Come share you experiences, ideas, challenges, and ways that the Innovations Council can support urban music educators.
    Innovations , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  14. Windstars: An Exciting New Flexible Elementary Music Curriculum
    Brittany Bauman, Nuvo Instrumental
    During this session, participants will actively learn about a new flexible elementary music methodology that combines general music experiences with beginning woodwind skills. This approach is based on “sound before sight” and is firmly rooted in the National Music Standards. Some Nuvo instruments will be provided so attendees can participate in a mini lesson. Nuvo instruments are designed to be easily accessible by children which make them a nice progression instrument to bridge the gap between recorder and beginning band.
    Commercial , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  15. Keeping Current
    Mimi Rabson, Berklee College of Music
    This session will show you how to get your kids engaged by playing the music they listen to outside of the classroom. With a few easy technique adjustments and some solid ear work, any group of string players can easily participate in the music they already know. Learning music this way is great for listening skills, practical music theory and offers an easy entry into improvisation. Please join me with your instrument to try out this easy and fun way to expand your students’ repertoire and technical skills into the music they choose.
    Strings , Fri, 3:15-4:15

  16. Lift Every Voice and Sing: A Reading Session for Mixed Choirs
    Andy Beck, Alfred Music
    Come join fellow choral directors in song as Andy Beck presents exceptional new literature from Alfred Music. Discover solid concert, contest, and popular repertoire designed to bring out the very best in your intermediate to advanced choral ensembles. A complimentary music packet will be given to each director in attendance.
    Commercial , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  17. Repertoire Selection, Practice and Sight-Reading Made Easy with the New SmartMusic
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    The New SmartMusic is a web-based platform that continues the tradition of our classic product while expanding access and reducing price. Come discover the immense library of titles available in the platform and how to improve your ensemble and student’s performance by practicing with accompaniment, repetition loops, music on screen and immediate feedback. Instant sight-reading will let you and your students know where they are and what they need to do to improve.
    Commercial , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  18. Find Your Voice: Enabling Students with Special Needs in the K-12 Music Classroom
    Julia Conceison, Liberty University
    Music educators have the challenging task of differentiating musical instruction to meet the needs of a wide range of diverse students, including those with physical, developmental, intellectual, and learning disabilities. Our lecture will discuss how these special needs are addressed in the music classroom and will include interviews from students with various special needs about their experiences in the secondary choral and instrumental music classroom. Come join us as we seek to promote unity, inclusion, and excellence in music education and show that all students can learn to love and engage in music-making.
    General Music , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  19. Creative Movement: Assessing Students Through Kinesthetic Experiences
    Alice Hammel, James Madison University
    Some students are unable to provide verbal responses and can show us much more of their understanding through movement. For these students, it is essential that we include movement and kinesthetic experiences as part of our learning sequences. During this session, we will explore a movement sequence that can span K-8. These experiences are chosen to demonstrate many of the objectives we assess in our curricula. This session is active (and fun).
    General Interest , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  20. Drill Writing Techniques and Strategies for Small Marching Bands
    Steven Riley, College of the Holy Cross
    This session will explore drill writing techniques and strategies for small marching bands with less than ideal instrumentations. Concepts such as planning, perspective, staging, and quick solutions for making small ensembles appear larger will be discussed.
    Band , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  21. Local Music Education Advocacy: Making a Difference for Music Education
    Lynn Tuttle, NAfME
    Join with your colleagues to discover advocacy strategies which will support your local school music needs. What strategies have been working for others in your state? What messaging works best with the stakeholders you are attempting to influence? How and when can policy strengthen your advocacy requests? Lynn will share out the updated NAfME local advocacy toolkit and help you develop an advocacy plan for your community.
    MMEA , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  22. A Music Composition Project for Your Middle Schoolers - and You
    Steve Damon, Union 38
    My middle school students communicate (email, Skype, and written letters) with famous contemporary composers. Since I had Ellen Rowe conduct the 2002 MMEA All-State Jazz Ensemble for me, my students communicate with her. When I found out her composition technique for her piece "...And Miles to Go," I knew I wanted to share it with my middle schoolers – and you. This unit became the capstone project for my mandated class for teaching ELLs. Come prepared to solfege, learn, and compose.
    Innovations , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  23. Honoring the Ear: Expanding Our Definition of Musical Literacy
    Connie McKoy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
    This presentation will focus on aural learning as a critical facet of music instruction. Participants will explore how aural learning can be used effectively in understanding culturally diverse facets of musicianship and literacy.
    MMEA , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  24. Young Composer's Forum
    John Wallace, Boston University
    Students whose compositions have been selected for recognition at the conference will have the opportunity to work with composer and composition professor John Wallace from Boston University. All students who have been selected to participate will be recognized with certificates at this session.
    Innovations , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  25. Who do we work for, anyway?
    Arto Asadoorian, Belmont Public Schools
    The number of professional responsibilities and mandates heaped upon public school teachers in the past several years has grown exponentially. At the same time, the amount of time we get to spend planning and delivering instruction to students seems to get smaller and smaller. This session will provide strategies and discussion about how to prioritize our work so that we can efficiently (and effectively) complete the professional tasks that we HATE, and focus more energy and attention on the thing we LOVE: teaching music with enthusiasm and with joy.
    General Interest , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  26. Gadgets & Gizmos for the Elementary School Orchestra
    Cassandra Sulbaran, Braintree Public Schools
    Learn about everyday items that can help in the elementary orchestra and beyond. This session will be part lecture/demonstration, part try-it-yourself, and part group sharing. Topics will include: bow hold, marking the fingerboard techniques, shoulder and chin rest set-up advice, endpin positioning, left hand posture, and useful new apps. Bring your favorite ideas and learn some new ones, too! Demo instruments from Johnson Strings will be provided for this session.
    Strings , Fri, 4:30-5:30

  27. Future of Music Technology: Web-Based Music Applications for Music Collaborative Process Part 2
    Chee-Ping Ho, Berklee College of Music; Gillian Desmarais, Berklee College of Music
    To establish and encourage the use of music technology with cloud-based tools among schools and artists. Participants use these synchronies to collaborate on creative projects with artists, schools, and beyond. Featuring recorded content with the following artists: Percussion: Taku Hirana - http://www.takupercussion.com Trumpet: Sean Jones - https://www.sean-jones.com Alto Sax: Fabian Lim - https://www.selmer.fr/musicfiche.php?id=843 Vibraphone: Victor Mendoza - http://victormendoza.com Guitar: Shun Ng - https://www.shunng.com Electric Bass: Victor Wooten - https://www.victorwooten.com
    Technology , Sat, 8:00-9:00

  28. Integrate Improvisation and Ignite the Imagination
    Paul Barringer, Somerville Public Schools
    This session will focus on developing creative improvisation strategies in the elementary music classroom. Using folk songs and speech and movement materials, participants will discover ways to weave improvisation into every lesson as a natural part of learning music concepts. Learn to guide your students to become collaborative participants and active music makers at every step of the learning process. Come and explore the possibilities!
    General Music , Sat, 8:00-9:00

  29. Ready, Set, Resources! General Music Materials
    Andy Beck, Alfred Music
    Sing, dance, play, and learn along with Andy Beck as he shares new and favorite resources designed especially for the general music classroom. From ready-to-go lesson plans, templates, and manipulatives to interactive white board software and complete performance programs, this session is overflowing with outstanding elementary music materials!
    Commercial , Sat, 8:00-9:00

  30. Puerto Rican Singing Games and Rhymes for the Music Classroom
    Vimari Colón-León, Rockingham County
    Singing games are a great way to teach musical ideas, incorporate movement, and give children an opportunity to connect with their cultural heritage, as well as the cultures of others. In this session, you’ll participate, and have fun learning about how to incorporate children’s games from Puerto Rico in your classroom. The talk will also emphasize the possibilities of these songs of being used to teach Kodaly-inspired concepts.
    General Music , Sat, 8:00-9:00

  31. Let's Make One Thing Perfectly Clear: Common Conducting Problems and How to Fix Them
    David Rox, Gordon College
    Whether we are experienced or inexperienced conductors, many of us fall into a myriad of common traps that make our conducting gestures vague, misleading, and counterproductive. "When there is a mist on the podium, there is a fog in the ensemble." Conducting problems negatively impact rehearsal technique and our overall efficiency. This session will address some common physical conducting problems and how to remedy them, including body hinge points, beat size, podium presence, starting, stopping, and dealing with the "dreaded fermata."
    Band , Sat, 8:00-9:00

  32. Innovations Festival
    Tom Westmoreland, Lynnfield Public Schools
    The Innovations Council is proud to host MMEA's second annual Innovations Festival as part of the 2018 conference. Several school ensembles from around the Commonwealth will participate in a clinic with Dr. Josef Hanson, UMass Boston Assistant Professor of Music. Students will then present a concert hour that is open to all members and the public. Join us as MMEA highlights outstanding ensembles that use contemporary music, pedagogy, or instrumentation in schools.
    Innovations , Sat, 9:00-11:30

  33. Copyright Do's and Don't's in a Digital World
    Tonya Butler, Berklee College of Music
    Imagine that you are the music director for your school's annual holiday concert. You want to perform several contemporary pop songs, stream the concert on the internet, record a souvenir album for the parents, and post videos of the show on your school's website and social media. You are somewhat familiar with copyright law but what you learned about copyright doesn't quite answer your plethora of questions. For example: Can you and your students perform any song you want? Can you stream the live concert on the internet? Can you make an audio-only recording of the concert to give to the parents? Can you videotape the concert and post it on your school's webpage? Are you free to post video of the concert on Facebook and YouTube? Can the students post songs on their Sound Cloud accounts? So many questions... so little time (and money)! Fortunately, there is MMEA and Professor Butler's "Copyright Do's and Don't's in a Digital World." Join us as we answer your everyday questions about what you can and cannot do in the ever-changing world of digital rights.
    Technology , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  34. Elementary Movement Activities…Creating Opportunities To Achieve Meaningful Vocal Improvisation
    Kenneth Trapp, Stratford CT Public Schools
    The spirit of our new music standards is to empower students to improvise and make music independently as they become lifelong learners. This session will provide participants with ideas and materials to use in the K-2 general music classroom that will help students to improvise in an authentic manner. Participants will learn how to use their existing movement activities as a springboard for meaningful vocal improvisation. Audio and video examples of student work will be shared. Objectives/ National Standards MU:Cr1-2.a - (Imagine) Improvise patterns and ideas that represent specific interests, concepts, or purpose. (MU:Cn10-2.a) MU:Cr1-2.b - (Imagine) Generate musical patterns and ideas within the context of a given tonality (such as major and minor) and/or meter
    General Music , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  35. I Will Sing! New 2-part Choral Repertoire
    Andy Beck, Alfred Music
    Don’t miss this “Sing and Learn” session with Andy Beck. See what’s new for 2-part treble choirs. Learn about the composers, effective vocal tips, easy movement ideas, and more! A complimentary music packet will be given to each director in attendance.
    Commercial , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  36. The Bornoff Approach for the School Orchestra
    Debbie Lyle, President, Foundation for the Advancement of String Education (FASE, Inc.)
    Created for group classes and first published in 1949, George Bornoff's original "Finger Patterns" is the basis for many of the new string books being published today. This hands-on session will introduce the process and the foundations of the pedagogy including: "Cycle Form," "Creative Review," "Patterns and Variations," and multi-level teaching. Participants will be provided with printable exercises to take back to their classrooms, and are encouraged to bring their instruments!
    Commercial , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  37. Project Based Learning and Developing Independence in Elementary Music
    Allyn Phelps, Northborough Public Schools
    This session will explore the advantages of dismantling the traditional teacher-focused music classroom and replacing it with an environment that allows students to take the lead in their own learning through developing musical independence and allowing for significant student choice. Three major goals for this session: 1. Explore research and personal stories on the benefits of student choice and independence in education. 2. Learn specific activities that can develop student musicianship and allow students to have the proper foundation to make musical choices. 3. Explore ideas for projects, K-5, that allow for student independence and allow for measurable student growth.
    General Music , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  38. Building Confidence and Character: Student Mentoring in the Elementary Instrumental Classroom
    Allison Penn, Needham Public Schools
    The first few years learning an instrument are considered to be the launching point for future participation in ensembles. There is also potential to develop leadership skills and further peer relationships across grade levels. Having a peer model one grade level ahead can provide increased musical and social interaction. Mrs. Penn will share her experience with the mentoring program at Newman Elementary, which she co-created with her students, that benefits both the beginning and advanced learners in her before-school band. This session will include opportunities for creatively collaborating and sharing best practices.
    Band , Sat, 9:15-10:15

  39. Finale 101: Learn the Essentials to Get You Going
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    Learn how easy it is to compose, arrange, edit, transpose, listen to and print your music with Finale. Topics include: Setting up a score, note entry with or without a MIDI keyboard, entering dynamics, markings and lyrics, key and instrument transposition, basic page layout, printing parts, exporting to audio and tips on sharing your music with others. Learn about the 100’s of ready-to-use music education resources included in the software (worksheets, flash cards, repertoire and classroom music tools).
    Commercial , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  40. A General Music Ukulele Curriculum; Where To Start?
    Kenneth Trapp, Stratford CT Public Schools
    The goal of this session is to help participants understand how general music activities can be naturally sequenced to instrumental performance. Ideas and activities will be shared that empower students to learn in an authentic manner as early as grade 1. Participants will: Learn to sing and play harmony in a linear manner. Develop skills to play melodic patterns by ear. Realize how aural skill development will lead naturally to music reading. Develop a repertoire of familiar songs. Learn to work in groups to create arrangements and accompaniments. Learn how to include many styles of music including; folk, rock, classical and the pop music students currently listen to. Develop ways to construct collaborative group work that can create two and three part ukulele choirs.
    General Music , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  41. Find Your Voice: Enabling Students with Special Needs in the K-12 Music Classroom
    Julia Conceison, Liberty University
    Music educators have the challenging task of differentiating musical instruction to meet the needs of a wide range of diverse students, including those with physical, developmental, intellectual, and learning disabilities. Our lecture will discuss how these special needs are addressed in the music classroom and will include interviews from students with various special needs about their experiences in the secondary choral and instrumental music classroom. Come join us as we seek to promote unity, inclusion, and excellence in music education and show that all students can learn to love and engage in music-making.
    General Music , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  42. Playing the Long Game: Planning Beyond Beginning Band with Your Beginning Brass Students
    Jason Sulliman, Troy University (Troy, AL)
    We often teach our beginning brass students how to be successful at beginning-level repertoire. Will their success scale up to middle school? High school? College? We often leave that responsibility to the next teacher or school, however, several recent developments in scientific research suggest that the specific way that we start our students will have a profound impact on their success later on. I will discuss common strategies with beginning bands and showcase potential limitations with common pedagogy. I will introduce specific and applicable tips for beginning band educators that will help prepare young brass players for long-term success.
    Band , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  43. Kodaly Pedagogy in the Choral Rehearsal
    Beth Anne Young, Middleboro Public Schools
    In this session, participants will come away with tools and resources to help them implement the use of Kodaly Pedagogy in the Choral Rehearsal. We will explore how to use and plan rehearsals using the three P's of Kodaly, Prepare, Present and Practice in the Choral Classroom/Rehearsal. This will be an active session where participants will sing, dance and experience a Kodaly-inspired Choral Rehearsal.
    Choral , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  44. Supporting English Language Learners in the General Music Class
    Vimari Colón-León, Rockingham County
    Working with young English Language Learners (ELLs) presents a unique set of challenges. In order to achieve the highest level of success in the music classroom, it's important to acknowledge these and understand how they affect student learning. In addition, it is vital to know specific strategies that work effectively in this context. If you want to reach ELL students and help them be creative and successful, this session is for you!
    General Music , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  45. Fostering Diversity in Our Choral Ensembles Through Engagement in Our School Community and Repertoire Selection
    Felicia Barber, Westfield State University
    This session will focus on ways that teachers may encourage diversity within their ensembles specifically with recruiting and engagement in cross curricular activities, as well as diverse repertoire. The session hopes to give teachers practical strategies for the classroom as well as a sample reading packet of repertoire that will strive to highlight underrepresented cultures, styles, and composers.
    Choral , Sat, 10:30-11:30

  46. Using SmartMusic as a Resource for Differentiation
    Leigh Kallestad, MakeMusic, Inc
    Learn how to use SmartMusic to design lessons based on students’ learning styles and easily tailor instruction to meet individual needs. With SmartMusic, students can be assessed on an on-going basis so that teaching, and indeed the other methods of differentiation, can be continuously adjusted according to the learners’ needs.
    Commercial , Sat, 11:45-12:45

  47. A General Music Ukulele Curriculum; Advanced Learning
    Kenneth Trapp, Stratford CT Public Schools
    The new National Core Music Standards provide a framework for developing student independence and musical literacy. The spirit of these standards is to build life long music learners who can naturally play traditional and non-traditional instruments. The ukulele is a user-friendly instrument that can be played successfully by students from early elementary age through adulthood. This session will offer innovative ways to develop music skills both vocally and instrumentally with a referenced to the ukulele. Differentiated instruction will be emphasized as a way to help insure the success of all students. Play simple to complex finger patterns to familiar songs; Play three string chords with an articulated rhythm; Play open string melodies; Play melodic patterns; Students improvise melodic patterns that the teacher echoes; Read melodic patterns; Read arrangement “London Bridge”; Play in Chord Teams; Play in three part ukulele choirs; Play current pop songs “Rock-a-bye” “One Call Away” “Fight Song” etc.
    General Music , Sat, 11:45-12:45

  48. Multicultural Musical Role Models: Inspiring Diverse Students through Engaged Listening
    Adam Epstein, Cambridge Public Schools
    In our increasingly diverse and inclusive nation, how can we inspire all our students to continue making music independently throughout their lives if we do not expose them to musical role models with whom they can identify? This session will explore the “Musician of the Month” listening framework which presents a balance of genders, musical styles, and cultures throughout each academic year. The presenter will share successful strategies for implementing this approach across all grade levels, preK-12. Participants will be challenged to consider their own musical heritage, the musical heritages of their students, and an expanded definition of “art music.”
    General Music , Sat, 11:45-12:45

  49. Keeping Current
    Mimi Rabson, Berklee College of Music
    This session will show you how to get your kids engaged by playing the music they listen to outside of the classroom. With a few easy technique adjustments and some solid ear work, any group of string players can easily participate in the music they already know. Learning music this way is great for listening skills, practical music theory and offers an easy entry into improvisation. Please join me with your instrument to try out this easy and fun way to expand your students’ repertoire and technical skills into the music they choose.
    Strings , Sat, 11:45-12:45

  50. Guiding Your Future College Music Majors: Advice from Current Students
    Robert Franzblau, Rhode Island College
    Do high school music teachers influence college music students’ achievement? You bet they do, and mentoring the music majors of tomorrow also strengthens your entire program. This engaging and interactive panel discussion details the fundamental knowledge, skills, and attitudes students need to prepare for college music study. Panelists are current college music majors. It is based on the clinician’s book, "So You Want to Be a Music Major: A Guide of High School Students, Their Parents, Guidance Counselors, and Music Teachers," published in 2013 by Meredith Music Publications.
    General Interest , Sat, 11:45-12:45

  51. Time to Let Go: Moving Responsibility from the Podium to the Ensemble
    Mark Stickney, Plymouth State University
    We conductors need to be confident and secure enough to let go of some of what we do. It is time to give more responsibility to our ensembles, and teach our students how to create with our guidance and not by just doing what we tell them to do. This session will discuss teaching methods that help the students take responsibility for their creative process in a concert band setting.
    Band , Sat, 11:45-12:45

Massachusetts Music Educators Association

MMEA logo

Dr. Michele Holt
Executive Director
PO Box 3886
South Attleboro, MA 02703-3886