Session Descriptions

Session Descriptions - 2019

  1. Advocacy in MASS
    John Mlynczak, Noteflight, a Hal Leonard Company
    MMEA is investing in advocacy in many ways and there are a number of initiatives where you can easily participate. In addition, advocacy is something we do everyday and we will explore ways to all be better advocates for music education in our state. Come to learn and be inspired!
    Gen Int, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 1ABC

  2. The Kodaly Approach: What is it and How can I use it Tomorrow?
    Charlyn Bethell, Retired: Concord Public Schools
    This session will focus on what Kodaly philosophy is and how it is useful immediately in your teaching. We will take materials that can be easily taught and then use them in multiple ways, as in a spiral curriculum. Using this format, we will create a sequence for teaching movement and end with some simple folk dances.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 2

  3. Jazz Improvisation Open Forum
    Dino Govoni, Sponsored by David French Music Co.
    Jazz Improvisation Open Forum will focus on working through improvisational issues within your band. We will play various types of tunes and talk about how to use these to improvise with your students. This session will also encourage questions, which will guide us towards specific topics that concern you. Instruments are welcome.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 3

  4. From the Ground Up: Building a Choir from Nothing
    Kirsten Oberoi, South Shore Children's Chorus, Foxboro Public Schools
    Are you looking to start a chorus? Do you have a small program that you are looking to build? Whether you are interested in a community music program of adults, a children's chorus/band/orchestra, or your school program, you can make your dream and vision become a reality. Kirsten Oberoi has founded several successful chorus programs, including most recently the South Shore Children's Chorus (2016) based out of Quincy and Sharon MA which now serves almost 100 students in just over 2 years. Learn the secrets of starting a successful program including: -Successfully Marketing/Advertising with a budget of $0 -Recruiting and Retaining Participants -Culture Building = The Secret Weapon....and more!
    Choral, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Beacon Hill 1

  5. Let's Get It Started In Here: Fostering Creativity and Expression in the K-5 Music Classroom
    Darla Hanley, Berklee College of Music
    In a data-driven and often distracted world, it can be challenging for students to be creative. Come experience new ways to get elementary students to make creative musical choices and share the joys of music making. In this session audience members will explore standards-based ready-to-use activities that will have students creating and improvising in no time. Activities include singing, playing, moving, composing, improvising, listening, and more! Participants will leave with playlists, a bibliography of children's books, and a set of teaching strategies that are ready-to-go for Monday morning (or anytime you need them).
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Beacon Hill 2&3

  6. Tried And True Techniques: A Roundtable Discussion for String Teachers
    Colleen MacDonald, Weston Public Schools; Whitney Tandon, Wayland Public Schools
    This popular session is being offered for the third year in a row to continue the wonderful sharing of tried and true teaching techniques in the string orchestra classroom. We will continue discussion on left and right hand position, bowing and vibrato technique, and classroom management, as well as branch into new areas for sharing such as assessment, repertoire and recruitment. Please come share your ideas with our Massachusetts string community. We have a wealth of knowledge among us!
    Strings, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Cambridge Complex

  7. Arrr, mateys!: Sea Chanteys, Songs of the Sea, and Stories for the Early Elementary General Music Classroom
    Liam Leahy, North Attleboro
    This session will feature a hands-on selection of songs, games, and stories for use in the early elementary school general music classroom (1st through 3rd grade especially). Stemming from the clinician's "Pirate Month" Unit, these activities take inspiration from adventure and life on the open seas during the Golden Age of sailing and whaling. Activities will include rote singing, movement games, improvisatory movement, soundscape creation, and interdisciplinary connections.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Back Bay Complex

  8. Interdisciplinary Arts: An Agent for Community Building
    Ida Pappas, Lesley University
    High schools are microcosms of society. Students of different backgrounds, languages, past experiences, abilities and financial means are forced into close proximity and required to collaborate regularly. With teen suicide rates on the rise, and concerns about school shootings, it is essential that school administrators seriously contemplate how to create community within their schools. With this research, I hope to provide evidence to support the inclusion of interdisciplinary arts projects into the fabric of students' high school curricular and extra-curricular experiences.
    Gen Int, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Federal Complex

  9. Music Education Displacement: The Hidden Voices
    André de Quadros, Boston University; Kinh Vu, Boston University
    André de Quadros and Kinh Vu will discuss issues surrounding displaced citizens in the US and the world. As this is an issue that is happening globally, they consider how groups are becoming marginalized and as a result, how their voices are not being represented nor heard.
    Innov, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, Skyline

  10. Top Ten Tips -- to make your percussion section instantly sound better
    Stuart Marrs, Yamaha
    The top 10 technical issues and sound production concepts from the band/orchestra percussion section including major instruments and auxiliary instruments where a small adjustment can make a huge change in sound and performance. The session will focus on ten take-away fixes that students can apply to their playing without years of lessons and practice.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 8:00-9:00, South End

  11. Teaching Essential Singing Skills in Choir
    Stephen Paparo, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Whether you are an experienced choral conductor or an instrumental music teacher who teaches choir, this session will provide a fresh perspective on how to develop your students' singing skills. You will learn the essential singing skills, techniques and exercises that engage students in their own learning process, and a framework for integrating these into your rehearsal process.
    Choral, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Plaza Ballroom

  12. Noteflight and Noteflight Learn
    Brian Rabuse, Central Berkshire Regional School District; Rebecca Hoffmann, Central Berkshire RSD
    This session is an overview of Noteflight- a web-based music notation program that works on any computer connected to the internet including smartphones, tablets and Chromebooks. Noteflight Learn is a product that enables educators to organize music classes, and collaborate using shared music notation files, activity templates, audio recording, and syncing media (like YouTube videos) to notation files and scores within Noteflight. This session will also include an overview of Noteflight content libraries- complete band, orchestra and choral arrangements along with piano, guitar and pop music libraries. This session will demonstrate ways that Noteflight can be used in the classroom in many settings and grade levels.
    Tech, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 1ABC

  13. 12 Steps to Music Literacy Using Conversational Solfege Level 1: Rhythm Development
    John Feierabend, Retired
    Through carefully sequenced activities this fun workshop will address the National Core Standards while demonstrating how to enable students to joyfully assimilate the content and skills necessary to become musically literate including the acquisition of listening, rhythmic reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation in an intuitive manner. Participants will experience a curriculum that grows out of tonal and rhythmic elements that exist in the folk song literature of this country. Each rhythm element will be explored in patterns, songs and themes from classical literature.
    Coml, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 2

  14. Jazz Basics - Pedagogy and Resources
    Jeffrey Leonard, Boston Conservatory at Berklee
    Do you have limited Jazz background, but find yourself responsible for teaching a jazz group in your teaching assignment? Would you like to brush up on essential jazz pedagogy, especially specifics about stylistic interpretation and improvisation? Are you looking for more resources to broaden your teaching in the jazz idiom? If so, this session was designed for you. Bring a question and/or a problem with which you'd like some help.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 3

  15. Forum on the Revised MA Music Standards
    Lisa Leach, Worcester Public Schools
    Come participate in a forum designed to give up-to-date information about the revised Music Standards. A panel of teachers, administrators and college music education faculty met over the course of the Summer and Fall to carefully review and revise the 1999 Music Standards.The form will feature an update and a time for Q & A from those who served on the panel.
    MMEA, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Beacon Hill 1

  16. Tips and Tricks for teaching infant and toddler music classes
    Connie Greenwood, University of Hartford
    Seasoned First Steps in Music teacher trainer, Connie Greenwood will share her secrets to having a successful and productive infant and toddler music class with parents or in a Pre-K classroom.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Beacon Hill 2&3

  17. Tried And True Techniques: A Roundtable Discussion for String Teachers
    Colleen MacDonald, Weston Public Schools; Whitney Tandon, Wayland Public Schools
    This popular session is being offered for the third year in a row to continue the wonderful sharing of tried and true teaching techniques in the string orchestra classroom. We will continue discussion on left and right hand position, bowing and vibrato technique, and classroom management, as well as branch into new areas for sharing such as assessment, repertoire and recruitment. Please come share your ideas with our Massachusetts string community. We have a wealth of knowledge among us!
    Strings, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Cambridge Complex

  18. Empowering Choral Singers as Soloist and Readers
    Marc Greene, Ithaca College
    Every singer is a soloist - there is no such thing as "just" a choral singer! Establish a culture of solo singing of classic, folk, and theatre literature as part of your lesson and/or rehearsal routine. Connect solo vocal technique, interpretation and sight reading skills to embellish and refine your students' choral ensemble experience.
    MMEA, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Back Bay Complex

  19. Curriculum for Orff Teachers
    Gina DePaoli, Waltham Public Schools
    Participants will participate in Orff based general music lessons and reflect on how these lessons connect with the National Standards and their own curriculum. The presenter will guide attendees in the early stages of writing curriculum for their own teaching situation and share her knowledge acquired after years of writing curriculum and taking a "Curriculum for Orff Teachers" course.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Federal Complex

  20. Listening from the Inside: Mindfulness Techniques for the Modern Music Classroom
    Rebecca Schauer, Burlington Public Schools
    We live in a world in which Snapchat, Fortnite, soccer games and massive amounts of academic stress constantly compete for our students' attention. Therefore, it is more crucial now than ever for teachers to bring mindfulness into the music classroom"”for our students' sake and for ours. This clinic will provide strategies and techniques designed to encourage relaxation, focus, discipline, creativity, empathy and self-compassion among young musicians and teachers alike. The focus will be on students in grades 6-12, but all are welcome to attend.
    Innov, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, Skyline

  21. "But That Doesn't Work in Music!": A Guide to Advocacy and Growth in Teacher Evaluation
    Cara Bernard, University of Connecticut; Joseph Abramo, Univ. of Connecticut
    This session will help music teachers thrive in teacher evaluation systems. The session will help music teachers advocate for their teaching in four key areas common to teacher evaluation: questioning, differentiated instruction, literacy, and assessment while focusing on maintaining musical content. The session will focus on effective ways to communicate with evaluators and administrators during pre-observation and post-observation meetings. Finally, we describe steps music teachers can take after meetings to spark growth in practice and maintain communication with evaluators. Through this teachers might thrive through teacher evaluation while continue quality instruction in music.
    Gen Int, Thurs, 9:15-10:15, South End

  22. KEYNOTE: Beautiful
    Robert Duke, University of Texas at Austin
    Music is a fundamental form of human communication. Although many of us make music for pleasure alone in the privacy of our own homes, music experiences most often involve performers and listeners. Intelligent performers consider their musical intentions in terms how listeners will hear and interpret the music they make. Thinking about music in this way defines expressive goals for performers at all levels of experience and expertise.
    MMEA, Thurs, 10:30-11:45, Plaza Ballroom

  23. Music Production: Recording and Mixing Techniques
    Chee-Ping Ho, Berklee College of Music
    This session explores the fundamentals of digital audio technology, microphones, recording techniques, audio signal flow, integration of MIDI with audio tracks, signal processing, editing and mixing techniques.
    Tech, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Waterfront 1ABC

  24. Folk Dancin' Fun!
    Karin Puffer, Westborough Public School
    Let's spend an hour of the conference dancing! At this session, we will learn several folk dances appropriate for your general music classrooms. The dances will be quickly processed, then attendees will have hands on experience performing the dances. What better way to spend an hour? Dancing shoes not required, in fact, barefoot is fine!
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Waterfront 2

  25. Practical Principles – Three R's For Developing a Successful Beginning Band
    Joseph McIntyre, Montgomery County, Maryland
    Discover time saving, and easy strategies for achieving reliable results with your beginning band by following the basic three R's; Reading, Rhythm, and Repetition. Joseph McIntyre, author of "Practical Principles Method For Band," will discuss a variety of ways you can stay focused on teaching fundamentals, like breathing, embouchure, and articulation, while your class reads notation from day one. Your students succeed when they are playing fun rhythms, compelling melodies, and lots of repletion. McIntyre will discuss some common issues encountered by beginning band students, and share with you some unique solutions in overcoming them. Collaboration is our most powerful resource. Discussion from all participants will be encouraged!
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Waterfront 3

  26. Conducting Reboot: Refresh, retool, reimagine
    Sommer Forrester, University of Massachusetts Boston
    Conducting is a significant part of secondary music teacher’s daily practice, yet finding time to develop one’s craft is challenging given the demands of day-to-day life. The purpose of this session is to provide attendees with a set of practical tools and exercises to refresh and reimagine their skill and craft on the podium as musicians, educators, and communicators. Attendees will participate in hands-on activities that reinforce the connection between the gestural representation of a musical composition, technical knowledge, and knowledge of learners and their characteristics.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Beacon Hill 1

  27. Standards 101: A Summary Introduction
    Marc Greene, Ithaca College
    Learn about the National Core Arts Standards in this introductory session. Marc Greene, President of NAfME Eastern Division, will provide a brief history of its development, as well as an introduction to the basic contents. Handouts/links will available.
    MMEA, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Beacon Hill 2&3

  28. Teaching Guitar through Popular Music Education
    Scott Burstein, Little Kids Rock
    This workshop is centered on the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn to play guitar through popular music, focusing on reading through iconographic notation, utilize improvisation, and demonstrate how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire. Sample lesson plans will be discussed to show how to make the most out of basic musical elements and skills.
    Innov, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Cambridge Complex

  29. Straws and SOVT Exercises! Vocal Pedagogy for the Choral Director
    Paige Taylor, Falmouth Public Schools
    This session will provide choral directors with an overview of common vocal problems that may be encountered when working with middle school and high school aged singers. The session will help choral directors identify and correct common vocal issues using a variety of exercises. Resources and further reading materials will be provided.
    Choral, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Back Bay Complex

  30. Open Reading Session with backing tracks
    Julie Lyonn Lieberman, Artistic Director, Strings without Boundaries
    We'll explore a number of styles, as well as right- and left-hand techniques to "capture the style," including non-classical rhythmic grooves. We'll also touch on how students can create their own backing tracks and why they are so important for the study of American and world roots styles. Bring your own instrument and/or instruments will be available at session.
    Strings, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Federal Complex

  31. Keeping Your Job: Classroom Management Tips for New Teachers
    Anthony Beatrice, Boston Public Schools
    Be ready on day one of teaching by learning the ropes of successful classroom management techniques for the PreK-12 music educator! Specific topics include classroom setup, developing procedures/routines/transitions, example scripts for parent phone calls, therapeutic/non-violent crisis intervention, and building a positive classroom environment.
    Gen Int, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, Skyline

  32. Guitar Class for Students with Disabilities: Using Universal Design
    Sarah Fard, Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs/ Medford Public Schools
    Guitar elective classes are often fully inclusive, presenting open doors for students with disabilities who are often left out of instrumental music making. However, many guitar teachers express the need for more training in how to adapt for the needs of their students. The guitar is unique: in the standard approach to the instrument, it belongs to various forms of notation. Through the lens of universal design, the guitar curriculum can be adaptable to many. This presentation will evaluate current forms of notation and instruments and how to adapt them for our student's needs- feel free to bring a guitar!
    Innov, Thurs, 12:00-1:00, South End

  33. The Performance-Ready K-5 Music Classroom
    Allison Kipp, Loudoun County Public Schools
    Are you tired of having to select another concert for your students? Would you like to provide students with a meaningful performance that is linked to the standards you teach every day? Come experience an alternative to the formal performance/concert. Student-centered "Informances" provide opportunities for students to showcase their skills and knowledge and allows them to turn what they are learning in the classroom into a performance-ready program. Additionally, these experiences illustrate student learning and offer leadership opportunities as they "teach" audiences. Participants will leave with examples of previous Informances, a sample script and strategies and resources to help create an original Informance.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 1:15-2:30, Waterfront 3

  34. Nurturing the Young Musical Mind: A Multifaceted Approach to Early Childhood Music
    Anastasia Mousouli, Somerville, MA
    This workshop will provide ideas, strategies, and tips towards a comprehensive Early Childhood Music Education, aiming to inspire participants to create well-rounded, engaging lessons for their PreK and Kindergarten classes. We will explore and practice effective techniques and activities inspired by the Orff- Schulwerk, Kodály, and Dalcroze approaches, as well as various Early Childhood Music curricula.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 1:15-2:30, Back Bay Complex

  35. Creative Band and Orchestra
    Julie Lyonn Lieberman, Artistic Director, Strings without Boundaries
    Julie Lyonn Lieberman will introduce a number of playing and teaching techniques designed to stimulate creativity. She has spent over four decades exploring the common threads between styles that integrate improvisation and will show how these skills can be explored without concern for style as well as how they can be cross-applied to a number of genres, from traditional American and world roots styles to blues, pop and jazz. Bring your instrument.
    Strings, Thurs, 1:15-2:30, Federal Complex

  36. Attention on Retention
    Jeff Scott, Charleston County School District
    This session deals with how to make rehearsals interesting, fun and engaging for students with the goal of increasing program retention rates in middle school band. While this clinic is band centered, the concepts discussed apply to all ensembles.
    Coml, Thurs, 1:15-2:30, Skyline

  37. Help with your Color Guard. How to build a Guard you and your students will love.
    Christine Sirard, University of Massachusetts/Amherst
    Information on building a color guard program in middle and high school. Geared toward non-competitive programs or those looking to start competing. How to find an instructor, build student leadership, find costumes and equipment. Basic overview of terminology and similarities/differences to marching instrumentalists. Q&A for anything you ever wanted to ask about color guard.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 1:15-2:30, South End

  38. If we learn like that, why do we teach like this?
    Robert Duke, University of Texas at Austin
    Music teaching and learning are ensconced in traditions established long ago. What can informal learning experiences teach us about how learning works and how best to structure successful experiences in schools.
    MMEA, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Plaza Ballroom

  39. Creating on Any Device: Online music tech made easy
    John Mlynczak, Noteflight, a Hal Leonard Company
    Wondering how to teach music using Chromebooks or iPads with online tools? By combining music notation with a digital audio workstation, there are endless possibilities to incorporate music creation in all levels of music instruction. This session will demonstrate many proven lessons that can be used immediately, starting with free online software.
    Tech, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Waterfront 1ABC

  40. 12 Steps to Music Literacy Using Conversational Solfege Level 2: Melodic Development
    John Feierabend, Retired
    Literature using advanced Solfege patterns with a parallel development of rhythm patterns in 2/4 and 6/8 meter will be presented. Opportunities for early experience in part singing are demonstrated with, rhythmic and melodic sight-reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation. Participants will experience a curriculum that grows out of tonal and rhythmic elements found in folk song to classical literature.
    Coml, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Waterfront 2

  41. Teaching Ukulele through Popular Music Education
    Scott Burstein, Little Kids Rock
    This workshop is centered on the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through performance of modern band music – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity. Participants will learn to play ukulele through popular music, focusing on reading through iconographic notation, utilize improvisation, and demonstrate how all people are musical and can enjoy playing through familiar repertoire. Sample lesson plans will be discussed to show how to make the most out of basic musical elements and skills.
    Innov, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Waterfront 3

  42. Meaningful Middle School Band Rehearsals
    Jeff Scott, Charleston County School District
    This session addresses many skills and rehearsal techniques that can be utilized to create effective, relevant and fun rehearsals for middle school band programs. We will discuss the components of playing and ways they can be taught to middle school students.
    Coml, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Beacon Hill 1

  43. Showing your work: What your evaluator really wants to see in your classroom
    Heather Cote, Westwood Public Schools; Arto Asadoorian, Belmont Public Schools
    In this session, two experienced music supervisors will discuss teacher evaluations from the perspective of the administrator. Topics to discuss will include what supervisors want to see when they observe you in your classroom, how to help your administrator appreciate and understand the work you do, and how teachers can demonstrate proficiency as determined by the Massachusetts DESE evaluator standards.
    Gen Int, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Beacon Hill 2&3

  44. String Orchestra New Music Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli, Weston Public Schools
    This reading session will review the newest publications for string orchestra. Come and bring your instrument to sight read everything from beginning orchestra music through advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of Johnson String Instrument.
    Strings, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Cambridge Complex

  45. Music Moves Us Together: A Dalcroze Approach to Building Ensemble Skills
    Martha Rogers, Lexington Public Schools
    Do your students understand the power of a preparatory breath? Do they know how to interpret and respond to simple gestures for starting and stopping, changes in tempo, shifts in dynamics? Are they alive in their moments of silence? Do they feel the intuitive connections of making music together? Come explore the elements of creating connection within an ensemble using creative movement and listening.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Back Bay Complex

  46. Recruiting & Retaining Boys to Sing in Your Choir
    Reagan Paras, Anna Maria College
    Are you finding it difficult to recruit male singers into your vocal ensemble? You are not alone! Whether you teach junior high or high school, this session is for you. You will be provided tried and true strategies to help balance your choirs. Additionally, you will receive practical tips to develop a culture of acceptance and musical excellence which will dramatically improve retention rates.
    Choral, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Federal Complex

  47. Nurturing a Moving and Learning Child in the Music Classroom.
    Connie Greenwood, University of Hartford
    Based on Anne Green Gilbert's "Brain Dance" Connie will give music and movement ideas to rewire and encourage synaptic connections. She will address movement assessment and give specific ways to enhance movement creativity in the Pre-K through second grade classroom.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, Skyline

  48. Big Band Repertoire Selection,Something old ,something new,something borrowed ,something blue
    Paul Pitts, Boston Publi Schools
    Discussion of programing for the Jazz Big Band. Discussion of types of charts, blues, song form, pop, rock, funk and fusion. Chart selection for school concert versus festival preparation. Some discussion about Mingus Festival, Essential Ellington, MAJE Festivals, charts that teach educational concepts, charts that showcase the band, charts that students love to play, etc etc etc .
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 2:45-3:45, South End

  49. Eleven years of piano and I can't get a date.
    Robert Duke, University of Texas at Austin
    Developing meaningful goals for learning in music, recognizing that most music learners will not become professional performing artists. What is required of an adult who happily engages in active music making?
    MMEA, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Plaza Ballroom

  50. 21st Century Learning in the Music Classroom: Engaging and Empowering Students Through Formative Assessment and Technology
    Kate Mercadante, Shrewsbury Public Schools
    How do you really know what your students know? This session will focus on how music educators can use the technology that is so prevalent today – ipads, chromebooks, and cell phones – to empower and engage students with systematic formative assessment. Furthermore, these devices can be used to promote student choice, collaboration among students, and other 21st Century learning goals. The presenter will share the successful strategies she has used to increase learning and create data-driven instruction.
    Tech, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Waterfront 1ABC

  51. Intentional Movement in the Music Classroom
    Lillie Feierabend, Retired Music Teacher
    Think of your favorite finger play, action song or play party. Chances are there is some type of movement to enhance the song or chant. Children learn best when they are able to use their bodies. Most of our elementary repertoire contains a movement component which is worthy of the same explicit and intentional instruction that we devote to the tonal and rhythmic aspects of our curriculum. This lively session will share strategies and techniques to help children move purposefully and musically.
    Coml, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Waterfront 2

  52. Creating Artistry with Young Singers
    Marianna Simpson, Treble Choir of Houston
    The goal of this workshop is to introduce choral/vocal technique that will enable choir directors to work successfully with children. Topics include: developing a beautiful tone, ear training, independent singing, and singing with poise and expression.
    MMEA, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Waterfront 3

  53. Engaging Ensemble Students Through Project-based Partnerships
    Bonnie Cochran, Cochran Wrenn Duo
    Partnering with composers and professional musicians in school music ensembles is authentic project-based learning that reinforces concepts and helps students grow. Learn about Shrewsbury Middle School's partnership with composer George Lam and Marlborough High School's collaboration with the Cochran Wrenn Duo and composer Cody Forrest. Hear about the impact these experiential learning opportunities had on the participants and acquire tools for bringing these types of collaborative projects to your ensemble in a presentation followed by a panel discussion.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Beacon Hill 1

  54. Integrating Multi-Cultural Songs in K-12 Music Curricula
    Donna Menhart, The Hartt School, University of Hartford
    This active-learning session will demonstrate the various levels and purposes of international folk songs, chants, and movement pieces appropriate for traditional and non-traditional learning environments. Attendees will learn how multi-cultural songs are efficiently incorporated into the general music, choral, and instrumental classroom, providing aural, psychological, technical, and physical preparation for literacy. We will perform programmable options from various countries, giving educators the opportunity to experience the accessibility of international cultures that they may share with their students. Above all else, everyone will be reminded that music is the universal language and is meant to be shared.
    Gen Mus, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Beacon Hill 2&3

  55. String Orchestra New Music Reading Session
    Christopher Memoli, Weston Public Schools
    This reading session will review the newest publications for string orchestra. Come and bring your instrument to sight read everything from beginning orchestra music through advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of Johnson String Instrument.
    Strings, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Cambridge Complex

  56. Troubleshooting Choral Repertoire
    Ashley Nelson-Oneschuk, King Philip Public Schools
    This session is designed for choir directors who would like a hands-on experience troubleshooting basic issues applicable to teaching any piece of choral literature. Attendees will learn a short round and simple SATB piece together, addressing the fundamental elements of quality choral production.
    Choral, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Back Bay Complex

  57. Why We Dance: Celebrating Cultures through Movement in the General Music Classroom
    Valerie Diaz Leroy, QuaverMusic.com
    Movement activities are a natural ingredient to a successful lesson. But have you ever considered movement as a vehicle for cultural connections? In this workshop, attendees will unpack connections to history, geography, and social and emotional learning (SEL) through movement activities to classical, folk, and contemporary pieces. Movement instruction and analysis will help guide teachers through the steps of teaching traditional and original dances as well as learning to create movement opportunities appropriate for students at all levels!
    Coml, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Federal Complex

  58. A Philosophy of Hip-Hop Music Education
    Jarritt Sheel, Berklee School of Music
    The following lecture hopes to develop the discourses around a philosophy of hip-hop music education. The culture of hip-hop is diverse, malleable, concrete and abstract. Hip-hop is a cultural movement that is post-modern in orientation, and has cultural artifacts centered in the practice of collage. Philosophically, Hip Hop is an extension of radical western philosophical movements like critical theory and existentialism which promote liberty, freedom of thought and expression through critical critique. This lecture seeks to further the dialogue about the philosophies found in hip-hop, and their importance to the transformation of the profession of music education in America.
    Innov, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, Skyline

  59. Introducing the Newly Released Intermediate Band Unit Plans from the NAfME/Library of Congress Project
    Jenny Neff, The University of the Arts
    This session will introduce the newly released unit plan written by a member of NAfME's writing team for the Library of Congress grant project. Primary sources, accessible through the Library of Congress, that inspired unit plans for band repertoire at the middle school level will be shared. Lessons will focus on the artistic process of responding, while including performance concepts to help lead students to meaningful music making. The unit includes: An inquiry-based framework, Connections to the standards, Engaging Activities, Time-savers, Embedded assessment tools, Process-oriented practice guide, Information on Sousa and American march form (Library of Congress), Ready-to-use activity sheets that can be modified for other topics.
    Band/Jazz, Thurs, 4:00-5:00, South End

  60. Concert Band New Music Reading Session
    Catherine Haywood, Needham Public Schools; Gerry Dolan, Gordon College
    This reading session will review the newest publications for concert band. Bring your instrument/mouthpiece to sight read music from beginning band through more advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of David French Music.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Plaza Ballroom

  61. Digital Content & Solutions for the Chromebook Classroom
    Jim Frankel, MusicFirst
    The New York Times has called it the "Googlification of the Classroom", and it marks a profound paradigm shift in American education. Schools are adopting technology in droves, and Google's Chromebook now accounts for more than 50% of the mobile devices being shipped directly to schools. While this technology adoption is traditionally associated with academic subjects such as math and science, there is a huge opportunity for integration into the music classroom, as well. During this session, Dr. Frankel will introduce attendees to cloud-based technology designed specifically for music education that integrates with their existing technology. He will demonstrate how this technology works on various devices, and help teachers imagine how they might incorporate new software programs into their curriculum. In addition, he will educate attendees on their options for meeting school and district technology requirements, while simultaneously lightening their workloads by streamlining grading, lesson planning, and assessment processes.
    Coml, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 1ABC

  62. First Steps in Music: Movement Development in the Early Years
    John Feierabend, Retired
    During the early learning years, children can acquire musical sensitivities, which will provide them with a lifetime of expressive and accurate movement intuitions. This energetic session will present insights and activities that can foster those intuitions in children from birth to age nine, through the use of folk songs and rhymes as well as through movement experiences with classical recordings. Target Group: Pre - Kindergarten through Third Grade
    Coml, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 2

  63. Bowing Styles for the Ages: How to Choose and Play Bow Strokes for Baroque, Classical, and Romantic Era Music
    Bob Gillespie, The Ohio State University
    Is it long, short, short followed by a long, released, heavy, accented, stopped, articulated, legato? What is the right bow stroke for Baroque vs. Classical vs. Romantic Era music? How do I know? How do I mark it in the music? I do I teach it? How do I play it for my students? How do I diagram it for my students? Removing the mystery from different bow strokes. Dr. Gillespie's sessions are being sponsored in part by the Hal Leonard Corporation.
    Strings, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 3

  64. Who could pay attention to a lesson this dumb?
    Robert Duke, University of Texas at Austin
    The general music classroom can be a place of joy, imagination, creativity, and wonder. Or not.
    MMEA, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Beacon Hill 1

  65. Show Me the Money: Uncovering the World of Grants and Fundraising
    Rachel Rivard, Community Music School of Springfield
    No money? No problem! Finding funding for your classroom may be easier than you expect. If you've never written a grant before or have been funded but are unsure of what to do next, this session is for you! We will uncover the mystery of finding and writing grants, and reporting back to grant makers. There is money out there; you just need to know how to find it!
    Gen Int, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Beacon Hill 2&3

  66. What's New for Middle School Choirs?: A Reading Session
    Brendan Ferrari, Lexington Public Schools
    Come sing through some newer works aimed at middle school choirs. A particular focus will be repertoire that is appropriate for the changing male voice.
    Choral, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Cambridge Complex

  67. The National Standards: How To Unpack Them & Use Them In TheChoral Classroom
    Marc Greene, Ithaca College
    In this session, learn how to access and connect resources for the National Core Arts Standards website while planning and executing a choral rehearsal process leading to a performance. Strategies will include take away materials including lesson plans and assessment tools as well as hardcore connections.
    MMEA, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Back Bay Complex

  68. Poetry, Process, and Performance
    Griff Gall, Danvers Public Schools
    An enchanting collection of poetry about the night will be the inspiration for movement, improvisation, and performance of Orff-Schulwerk source materials. This workshop will focus on the creative process, culminating in a beautiful performance piece created by the workshop participants.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Federal Complex

  69. Learning Theories Made Real: A Down-To-Earth Approach to Teaching Music Using Pedagogical Science
    Josef Hanson, University of Massachusetts Boston
    At some point, all musicians teach. What differentiates credentialed music educators from other teacher-musicians? Among other distinctions, credentialed music educators are expected to develop theoretical understanding of how people learn, and then consciously incorporate this understanding into their lessons. At this session, participants will review established learning theories, discover new ones, and work together to translate them into real-world approaches for the music classroom and rehearsal hall. Theoretical perspectives highlighted through hands-on activities will include several from the Conditioning, Social Cognitive, Constructivist, and Motivation/Self-Regulation families of pedagogical thought. This interactive session will provide opportunities to collaborate, create, and contemplate.
    Innov, Fri, 8:00-9:00, Skyline

  70. Interactive Recorder Instruction - It's Fun And It Works!
    Lenna Harris, Macie Publishing Company
    Students have grown up in a digital world and positively respond to materials that are in the format to which they have grown accustomed. Many schools are now implementing Blending Learning-where learning continues outside the classroom through students' use of technology. Students are more motivated if materials are presented in an engaging and fun way. You want the materials you use to develop musicianship, teach music reading skills and rhythmic independence. You can now have the best of both worlds. Free online access codes will be supplied. Bring your laptop!
    Tech, Fri, 8:00-9:00, South End

  71. Concert Band New Music Reading Session
    Catherine Haywood, Needham Public Schools; Gerry Dolan, Gordon College
    This reading session will review the newest publications for concert band. Bring your instrument/mouthpiece to sight read music from beginning band through more advanced literature. A few instruments will be available for use courtesy of David French Music.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Plaza Ballroom

  72. Noteflight Marketplace: Buy and sell music notation online
    John Mlynczak, Noteflight, a Hal Leonard Company
    Compose and arrange music and sell as a digital notation file. Purchase music for your own ensemble and adapt and arrange as needed. Noteflight Marketplace changes the way we exchange digital music. This session will provide a thorough overview and truly amaze you!
    Coml, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 1ABC

  73. First Steps in Music: Vocal Development in the Early Years
    John Feierabend, Retired
    During the early learning years, children can acquire musical sensitivities, which will provide them with a lifetime of expressive and accurate singing intuitions. This lively session will present insights and activities that can foster those intuitions in children from three to age nine, through the use of folk songs and games.
    Coml, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 2

  74. The Hardest But Most Important Task in Our Profession: Teaching Beginners in a Large, Heterogeneous Class to Play Correctly
    Bob Gillespie, The Ohio State University
    Teaching beginners in a large heterogeneous class to play well is one of the hardest tasks in our profession. Teachers who effectively teach beginners are worth their weight in gold – and my they weigh a lot! Come explore the best pedagogy, research, motivation, assessment, technology, sequencing and strategies to get beginners to play their best. To get the high school orchestra to play its best, beginners must play well from the start. Dr. Gillespie's sessions are being sponsored in part by the Hal Leonard Corporation.
    Strings, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 3

  75. Practice makes better. Practice makes worse. Practice does nothing at all
    Robert Duke, University of Texas at Austin
    We learn when we practice. Sometimes we learn in ways that are advantageous. Sometimes not so much. Changes in the functional capacities of our behavior are visible manifestations of changes in the physical structure of the brain. Although we seldom think of learning experiences as brain-reorganization activities, they are most certainly precisely that. We'll discuss how to optimize practice as a component of music learning, making experiences in the practice room productive, meaningful, and engaging.
    MMEA, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Beacon Hill 1

  76. Podcast, Collaboration and Music Education Methods
    Libby Allison, Berklee College of Music; Carla Restivo, Berklee College of Music
    Trying to wade through the volumes of print and scads of electronic information about music teaching methods can be a daunting task. This session will explore the collaborative process of faculty and students as they create a podcast that will serve as a first resource for individuals seeking information about contemporary use of traditional methods. Conception, content and production of the podcasts, in Spanish and Italian as well as English, will be explained and there will be opportunity for discussion and feedback.
    Tech, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Beacon Hill 2&3

  77. When Your Choir is Too Tired to Phonate and You Need to Rehearse…!
    Judith Nicosia, Rutgers University
    When your choir is "sung out," either too exhausted or vocally impaired to sing well, what can you do to resuscitate the sound and help them get back to singing with better tone? This session will provide exercises and demonstrations that will release laryngeal tension, relax the vocal folds, improve breath flow, assist phonation, give singers a new way to experience resonance on their own (using inexpensive materials), and help rebuild healthy vocal habits. There will be a handout. Participants need to bring a pencil or pen, their own power supply (preferably a respiratory system) and a sense of humor.
    Choral, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Cambridge Complex

  78. Popular Music Education and Modern Band
    Scott Burstein, Little Kids Rock
    While popular music can be a powerful tool for generating interest in music, many teachers steeped in formal learning struggle to apply informal techniques to unfamiliar music. This workshop-demonstration is centered on the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated quickly and in an enjoyable manner for all ages by leveraging the musical choices of the individual. This is achieved through performance of modern band – culturally relevant music of students taught through approximation, music acquisition theory, and social equity.
    Innov, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Back Bay Complex

  79. Not Ready To Jump Right In? Then, Dip Your Toe!
    Heather Kirby, Dedham Public Schools
    So, you've heard about audiation, and music learning theory and you've been curious to know what the big deal is but you're not ready to take the plunge and jump right in! This session is for you! Come dip your toe in the water and experience ways to take your students' understanding to the next level by infusing some techniques that are simple, yet powerful, in engaging and enriching musical minds.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Federal Complex

  80. Instilling a Growth Mindset in Your Students for the Practice Room, Rehearsal Room and Beyond
    Andrew Hitz, David French Music
    The ground-breaking research of world-renowned psychologist Dr. Carol Dweck brought right into your rehearsal room! By reframing how you approach evaluating students and by changing the words you use in rehearsal, instill in your students a belief that rather than being born with fixed traits that anything can be learned by anyone.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 9:15-10:15, Skyline

  81. Delving Into the Vietnam Era Through Song
    Mary Ellen Junda, University of Connecticut
    This presentation features the efforts of a collegiate group, Earthtones Vocal Ensemble, to honor Vietnam Veterans by creating a concert commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive. We will examine the intricacies of this process that included: 1) developing an understanding of this volatile period; 2) selecting songs and military narratives; 3) engaging Vietnam Veterans and military personnel; and 4) constructing a program that would be representative and meaningful. Concert video excerpts, participants' reflections and veterans' responses will be shared, along with ways that other ensembles may reach out to veterans as a gesture of long-overdue reconciliation and respect.
    MMEA, Fri, 9:15-10:15, South End

  82. Digital Music for Social Justice
    Lincoln Smith, Veritas Prep Charter School
    Zoltan Kodaly advocated for children to learn music through the cultural background in which they grew up. But while our children have become increasingly diverse, our methods and materials have stagnated. Many music programs draw their curriculum from Irish and English folk traditions, in effect alienating students of color. Digital music composition provides a unique opportunity to engage all students, and address equity and social justice in music programs. This session will showcase free and inexpensive digital tools for composition in the classroom that are relevant to the rich cultural traditions of our children.
    Tech, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Waterfront 1ABC

  83. Bridges to the Community: Planting Seeds for a Lifetime of Musical Growth
    Lillie Feierabend, Retired Music Teacher
    Music Educators plant seeds for a lifetime of music making but teachable moments do not always happen in the classroom. If we provide musical opportunities outside of the music classroom, we can also invite our faculty, school, and community. When the community is invited to participate, they become invested not only in their child's development but the development of the music program, as well. This session will share a dozen ways to enrich the musical growth and development of your students, your school and your community while providing opportunities to inspire a lifelong love of music.
    Coml, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Waterfront 2

  84. Elementary Choral Reading Session
    Marianna Simpson, Treble Choir of Houston
    The goal of this session is to share some of the choral selections that have proven most popular with my choristers over the years.
    MMEA, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Waterfront 3

  85. Tips and Tricks to Keep 'em Coming Back - Retention Through the Grades
    Kat O'Toole, Hopkinton Public Schools; Kristy Foye, Easton Public Schools
    It's one thing to get the kids excited in the first place, but to keep them year after year isn't always easy and there can be so many factors that play into their decisions (schools, sports, finances, friends, time, support at home, etc). In this session, we explore ways to keep students engaged without burning them out.
    Strings, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Beacon Hill 1

  86. Habits of a Successful Middle School Band Director
    Jeff Scott, Charleston County School District
    This session focuses on program development for a middle school band (or really any) program. From recruiting to skill development to growing a program from the ground up. It is especially useful for young teachers and teachers trying to grow a successful program.
    Coml, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Beacon Hill 2&3

  87. Motivating the Adolescent: Okay, What Happened to Them? They used to like me and want to do what I asked? Now what do I do? Strategies for getting the adolescent to stay the course and give their best in school orchestra.
    Bob Gillespie, The Ohio State University
    What do we know from research about adolescents? What makes them tick? What makes them do the things they do? Based upon research, how can I get them to do the things I want them to do! Session will include research on the characteristics of adolescents and practical strategies to motivate them to give their all in the instrumental rehearsal. It can be done! Dr. Gillespie's sessions are being sponsored in part by the Hal Leonard Corporation.
    Strings, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Cambridge Complex

  88. Building A Rhythmic Vocabulary For Your Winds
    Eric Posner, Howard County Public School System; Thom Hannum, Umass Amherst
    The clinic will present concepts to establish a fundamental rhythmic vocabulary and a system to help solidify subdivision and internal pulse. We'll use a group of wind players to show the connection and benefits of this reading method and how it transfers to both sight-reading and repertoire excerpts.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Back Bay Complex

  89. Songwriting with Ukuleles
    Sarah McQuarrie, Bridgewater State University
    This session focuses on the use of ukuleles in the general music classroom to promote creativity through songwriting and improvisation. Participants will be introduced to techniques for teaching the basics of ukulele, online resources for enhancing the playing experience, and a series of songs and lesson plans in which students are given the opportunity to create and improvise.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Federal Complex

  90. Incorporating Beginners into High Schoool Band and Choral Programs
    Laura Lamore, Nashoba Valley Technical Regional School District
    High School Band and Choral programs can include beginners into their programs, even though it can be challenging. Some students never had an opportunity to learn music, or learned instruments informally on their own. This session will explore methods to include beginner students into music programs with more established musicians. Reading ability should not be the deciding factor of whether students can partake in high school music ensembles. With some creative thinking, gentle guidance, and technological tools, students from all different ability levels can be successful together. This session will provide specific ways for educators to help all students succeed.
    Innov, Fri, 12:30-1:30, Skyline

  91. Research for Practice: A Working Partnership
    Tawnya Smith, Boston University
    Learn cutting edge research on the topics that Massachusetts teachers identified were most relevant at last year's conference. Music education researchers will share key findings and offer implications for practice. Following these mini-talks, we will work together to identify new topics of interest for next year's conference.
    Gen Int, Fri, 12:30-1:30, South End

  92. Keep it Moving: Traditional World Dances
    Rachel Gibson, Westfield State University
    Come engage in folk dances from a variety of world cultures that are suitable for the elementary music classroom and beyond. Enhance your music curriculum with activities that allow for social interaction, responsive movement, exposure to world music, and participation in a joyous living tradition.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 1:45-3:00, Waterfront 2

  93. 5 Ways to Engage Hard to Reach Students
    Valerie Diaz Leroy, QuaverMusic.com
    Explore the intersection of technology and popular music as powerful tools for increasing engagement and retention in upper elementary and middle grade students. Participants will learn strategies for incorporating modern music, songwriting, digital composition, and much more! You'll walk away ready to meet your students where they are, using the music and devices already in their possession to address age-appropriate concepts and skills while inspiring a connection to music that will last a lifetime.
    Coml, Fri, 1:45-3:00, Waterfront 3

  94. Afghan Children's Songs: Preserving Culture
    Louise Pascale, Lesley University; Colleen Casey-Nelson, Central Connecticut State University
    Explore hidden treasures of traditional Afghan children's songs. Louise Pascale first collected these songs as a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1960's. After decades of conflict and artistic suppression, these songs are now part of Afghan children's culture through the Afghan Children's Songbook Project. Colleen Casey-Nelson has integrated this music into her classroom and joins Louise for this workshop. The impact of a country losing its music over two decades is profound. Come experience Afghan music, hear how it's being revived, and reflect not only on ways music can deepen cultural understanding and compassion but the ways music impacts all of our lives.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 1:45-3:00, Cambridge Complex

  95. Rock Your Repertoire: Engaging Your Students Through Collaboration and Modernization
    Kevin Oates, Maine Youth Rock Orchestra
    Your classroom will change year after year. So should your orchestral repertoire. Whether it is playing covers of pop | rock arrangements from the past 40 years or sharing the stage with artists from alternative genres, a classical foundation with contemporary programming is essential for program growth and success. Maine Youth Rock Orchestra will show educators the steps necessary to find the right programming and how to collaborate with local and national artists to bolster their orchestral program, both on and off the stage.
    Strings, Fri, 1:45-3:00, Federal Complex

  96. Rehearsal Clinic with Frank Battisti
    Frank Battisti, Retired
    Frank Battisti, Director emeritus of the New England Conservatory Wind Ensemble and member of the MICCA Hall of Fame, will share his rehearsal techniques with a lab band (most likely the band selected for the Friday afternoon concert). This will be an opportunity for music educators to see a master at work!
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Plaza Ballroom

  97. Help Students Prepare for Auditions with SmartMusic
    Ryan Sargent, MakeMusic, Inc
    Almost all music teachers have had students audition for All Region or All State ensembles, honor groups or college scholarships. Whether or not your students are working with private instructors, you can put a system in place to help them learn their etudes and excerpts, and New SmartMusic can help. In this clinic we will explore how you can create music and upload it into New SmartMusic using MusicXML. We'll also look at creating graduated assignments to guide the students' practice. Using these assignments and a system of incentives, you can differentiate instruction and help every student in your class prepare for a positive audition experience
    Tech, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Waterfront 1ABC

  98. Classroom Management: The Key to Successful Teaching
    Lillie Feierabend, Retired Music Teacher
    Music educators spend a great deal of time developing, designing and delivering wonderful lessons. Classroom management should also be the product of this type of thoughtful, intelligent, and sequential design. No matter how excellent the lesson, no matter how superb the musical examples, no matter how many content standards we can connect to, if students are not attentive, they are not learning. In a well-managed classroom, the focus is on the content and musical growth and development of each student. The ability to focus and be a successful learner is the foundation for a lifetime of learning.
    Coml, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Waterfront 2

  99. High School Choral Reading Session
    Sean Landers, Belmont Public Schools; Ashley Nelson-Oneschuk, King Philip Public Schools
    This session will provide quality repertoire for beginning and advanced high school choral ensembles. We will explore tried and true traditional literature as well as exciting newly-published octavos. Selections will include a diverse range of genres, styles and languages. Reading packets will be provided by J.W. Pepper & Son.
    Choral, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Waterfront 3

  100. "Beat Buddies": When Everyone has a Friend in Music
    Sarah Leahy, North Attleborough Public Schools; Kristine Chylinski, Brookline Public Schools
    Lessons utilizing individual stuffed animals ("Beat Buddies") for PreK-1st grade will be presented. This hands-on session will emphasize how to use "Beat Buddies" to promote beat competence and age appropriate vocal skills, as well as cooperation, classroom management, motivation/participation, and social-emotional learning.
    Gen Mus, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Beacon Hill 1

  101. Gadgets and Gizmos for Beginning Orchestra
    Cassandra Sulbaran, Braintree Public Schools
    Learn about everyday items that can help in the elementary orchestra and beyond. This session will be part lecture/demonstration, part try-it-yourself, and part group sharing. Topics will include: bow hold, marking the fingerboard techniques, shoulder and chin rest set-up advice, endpin positioning, left hand posture, etc. Bring your favorite ideas and learn some new ones!
    Strings, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Beacon Hill 2&3

  102. General Music: A Case for Ukulele
    Andrea Cook, Worcester Public Schools; Meredith Lord, Worcester Public Schools
    In this session we'll walk you through our homegrown ukulele curriculum and how we've changed middle school general music class from passive music appreciation to active music participation. You will have opportunities for hands-on learning and will be shown the steps needed to bring students through a successful ukulele playing unit. Though this curriculum was designed for middle school, it could easily be extended to upper elementary or high school. Bring your ukulele or use one of ours and get inspired!
    Gen Mus, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Cambridge Complex

  103. The Jazz Rhythm Section 101
    Paul Pitts, Boston Publi Schools; George Murphy, Foxboro Public Schools, Retired
    The basis of the jazz rhythm section. Basic bass lines, keyboard and guitar comping, drum set grooves and basic grooves. Appropriate balance and sound quality for jazz will be discussed. Accompanying a soloist , back up a section soli or kicking the whole band are topics that will be covered. Strategies for building (where to find players) ,maintaining and developing the young rhythm will be covered. The focus will be on rhythm sections in their first three years of playing in a rhythm section.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Back Bay Complex

  104. Bucket Drumming 4-12: Starting your own program
    Eytan Wurman, Cambridge Public Schools
    Bucket Drumming is a quick, easy, and affordable way to make a lot of noise (read "music") in your community! Notation, composition, improvisation, ensemble playing, self-evaluation, and community engagement are just some of the things that can be taught through this exciting medium. Learn how to start your own program and build lifelong musicians in your classes!
    Innov, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Federal Complex

  105. No-Tech, Low-Tech, and High-Tech Adaptations for Students with Special Needs
    Will Houchin, Somerville Public Schools/Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs
    Students with special needs often require adaptations to curriculum, instruction, and materials in order to be successful in the music room. In this session, Will Houchin of the Berklee Institute of Arts Education and Special Needs will offer up some of his favorite General Music adaptations to help facilitate all students' musical learning. Examples of adaptations will run the gamut from no-tech solutions to high-tech solutions. Whether your school and classroom is on the cutting edge of technology or keeps things simple, all general music teachers will be able to find benefit from the adaptations presented!
    Gen Int, Fri, 3:15-4:15, Skyline

  106. Earthtones: Exploring Cultures Through Song
    Mary Ellen Junda, University of Connecticut
    Non-western music ensembles are becoming more common in secondary schools and higher education. Those teaching these ensembles are presented with a number of pedagogical challenges in intercultural transmissions on topics that include cultural representation, authenticity, and performance practice. This session focuses on the development of Earthtones Vocal Ensemble and the issues faced in bringing to life the songs of underrepresented people and critical periods in history. The organization and development of the ensemble, student reflections and video excerpts of programs will be shared, concluding with reflections on the benefits and challenges of directing a non-traditional ensemble.
    Choral, Fri, 3:15-4:15, South End

  107. Young Band Reading Session
    Nicole O'Toole, Bedford Public Schools; Lindsey Sherman, Southborough Public Schools
    Looking for some new repertoire ideas for your beginning and middle school bands? Grab your instrument and have fun playing some music with your colleagues. Discover some new-to-you tunes from a diverse set of composers. Selected music will be appropriate for players in their first three years. An annotated list will be shared with you.
    Band/Jazz, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Plaza Ballroom

  108. Music Production on Ipad as a Culturally Responsive Teaching Tool: Using Soundtrap in a Collaborative Setting in Middle School.
    Stefano Marchese, Boston Public School; Andrea Pejrolo, Berklee College of Music
    The golden rule in music is "Listen". But, do we really hear what the students are saying? A culturally responsive teacher looks outside the area of his or her own expertise, beyond where they feel confident and well prepared, but sometimes this could mean facing challenges. Getting to know our biases is definitely a first fundamental step toward a professional and personal growth. Embracing something different or unknown to deeply reflect on it is even a bigger challenge. Music production is a great tool that today is accessible to all on a variety of different devices that can help foster creativity in our students. This session offers simple and ready to use skills that will expand the participants knowledge in music production as a culturally responsive teaching tool.
    Tech, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Waterfront 1ABC

  109. Singing Games and Activities for the Elementary Music Classroom
    Rachel Gibson, Westfield State University
    Come engage in singing games suitable for the elementary music classroom. Music activities that emerge from the songs will be presented and include several areas of a music curriculum such as rhythmic and melodic literacy, harmonic development, and improvisation. Learn new singing games and strategies to foster music literacy, engage students in musical play, and promote joy in the classroom!
    Gen Mus, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Waterfront 2

  110. Think, Sing, and Swing!!! Vocal Jazz Repertoire Selection and Reading Session
    Kevin McDonald, Wellesley Public Schools
    Embrace America's music by exploring useful topics associated with vocal jazz repertoire selection and joining the Wellesley High School Rice Street Singers in the performance of suggested vocal jazz charts. This session will present useful information on approaching the various jazz styles of swing, latin, ballad, and a cappella music for your ensemble.
    Choral, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Waterfront 3

  111. Autism in the Music Classroom
    Will Houchin, Somerville Public Schools/Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs
    Autism is found in 1 in every 59 students. Unfortunately, training on appropriate and effective teaching strategies for these students is not widely available. In this clinic, Will Houchin of the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs will guide teachers on crafting a better understanding of what autism is and how it affects their students. In addition we will discuss strategies, techniques, and resources teachers can implement to better serve their autistic students in the music classroom.
    Gen Int, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Beacon Hill 1

  112. I'm All Alone! Practical ways to work successfully with your Administration as a Specialist.
    Michael LaCava, Wellesley Public Schools
    In many districts, the music educator is the only music teacher in the building and is part of a "Specialist Team". This session is designed to support and provide ideas on how music educators can work successfully with their building and district administration to advocate for their programs. The session will focus on practical suggestions as well as provide an opportunity to ask the presenter specific questions as each district is unique. The presenter, Michael LaCava, has had numerous positions over his career including Fine and Performing Arts Coordinator, High School Assistant Principal and Elementary School Principal prior to his position in Wellesley as the Director of Performing Arts so he is able to provide insight into "both sides" of situations music educators and administrators work on each year.
    MMEA, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Beacon Hill 2&3

  113. String Project - An Inclusive Community Centered Approach to String Teaching
    Christian Hernandez, University of Massachusetts Lowell String Project
    This session will explore the unique impact community music programs have on the surrounding environment by using String Project as an example. String Project is a community-centered program that is partnered with local Universities and is founded through the National String Project Consortium. They are designed to be an after-school, community-based music education programs that focus on teaching and playing stringed instruments. The program works at a macro level by using undergraduate students as the primary teachers for the program. Along with the micro level, teaching students the skills needed to play a string instrument.
    Strings, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Cambridge Complex

  114. Unlocking the Treasures of Russian Choral Music for Children and Youth
    Marianna Simpson, Treble Choir of Houston
    This session is designed to introduce American choral conductors to the richness of Russian choral literature and the principals of Russian language pronunciation.
    MMEA, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Back Bay Complex

  115. Total Participation Techniques in the Music Classroom
    Shannon Ward-Leighton, Fitchburg Public Schools
    Originally created for general education classrooms, "Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner " by Persida & William Himmele provides educators with a living resource for classroom instruction that encourages student participation and critical thinking. This session will focus on how these tools can be adapted for the music classroom, and encourage participants to explore new ways to bring critical thinking into their general music and ensemble classrooms. This is a hands-on session, so be ready to "totally participate"!
    Innov, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Federal Complex

  116. Young Composer's Forum
    Joe Pondaco, Duxbury Public Schools
    Joe Pondaco, Leader of the Council for Composition will lead young composers in this clinic, which will feature a review and critique of original works by high school students from the state of Massachusetts.
    MMEA, Fri, 4:30-5:30, Skyline

  117. Sparking Creativity: Improvisation in the Choral Classroom
    Chris Clark, Southern Berkshire Regional School District
    One of our responsibilities as music educators is to spark musical creativity in our students. At the intersection of a performance-based choral ensemble and musical creation is vocal improvisation. This session will explore two possibilities for teaching improvisation at the middle and high school choral classroom: One that progresses sequentially and builds students skills, and one that is more exploratory in vocal tone and timbre.
    Choral, Fri, 4:30-5:30, South End

  118. The Art of Using SmartMusic to Foster Musical Growth
    Ryan Sargent, MakeMusic, Inc
    This clinic will focus on SmartMusic assignments that relate to rehearsal and group lessons and will drive your students to become better listeners and performers. Learn about specific assignments that have been used by seasoned educators that yield positive reactions from students. Strategies shared in this clinic assume you have projection and audio of SmartMusic available in your classroom.
    Tech, Sat, 8:00-9:00, Waterfront 1ABC

  119. Body Music
    Keith Terry, Crosspulse
    Body Music, also known as Body Percussion and Body Drumming, is the oldest music on the planet. Before people were hollowing logs and slapping rocks, they were using their bodies to stomp, clap, sing, snap and grunt their musical ideas. There are many traditional Body Musics in the world, from African-American Hambone and Flamenco Palmas to Sumatran Saman and Ethiopian Armpit music. Since 1978 Keith Terry has developed a contemporary style of Body Music based on his training as a jazz drummer, as well as his years of intensive study and collaboration with world rhythmic systems. Using the oldest instrument on the planet – the human body – we clap, slap, snap, step and vocalize our way through some very fun and funky, original and traditional rhythmic music. BODY MUSIC is an effective way of internalizing rhythmic work, which enhances the development of time, timing, phrasing, listening skills, independence, coordination and ensemble awareness. We will identify cultural and historical connections while exploring a variety of rhythmic systems and concepts from around the world, including polyrhythms, crosspulses, polymeters, phrasing, half time/double time, and more. It is a useful tool for anyone interested in deepening their rhythmic skills.
    Gen Mus, Sat, 8:00-12:45, Waterfront 2 & 3

  120. Everyday Inclusion
    Julie Duty, United Sound; Rhoda Bernard, Berklee College of Music
    This session will explore strategies that you can implement today to help the special education students who are already in your music programs learn and grow. The presenters will discuss several aspects of effective inclusion, including (a) the cognitive, behavioral, and social challenges of diverse learners, (b) modifications that you can make to your teaching and assessment that will help you better reach music learners. This session applies to all levels and all settings of music education.
    Gen Int, Sat, 8:00-9:00, Beacon Hill 2&3

  121. 12 Steps to Music Literacy Using Conversational Solfege Level 1: Rhythm Development
    John Feierabend, Retired
    Through carefully sequenced activities this fun workshop will address the National Core Standards while demonstrating how to enable students to joyfully assimilate the content and skills necessary to become musically literate including the acquisition of listening, rhythmic reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation in an intuitive manner. Participants will experience a curriculum that grows out of tonal and rhythmic elements that exist in the folk song literature of this country. Each rhythm element will be explored in patterns, songs and themes from classical literature. Coml, Sat, 8:00-9:00, Back Bay Complex

  122. Innovations Festival
    Tom Westmoreland, Lynnfield Public Schools
    Innov, Sat, 9:00-11:30, Amphitheater

  123. Easily Create Your Music Assignments with the New SmartMusic Notation Program
    Ryan Sargent, MakeMusic, Inc
    The educator version of New SmartMusic now has its own built-in web-based notation program, so you can quickly create exercises and assign them out to your students. Learn how easy it is for you to import, compose, arrange, edit, and transpose your music. Topics include: Importing and editing a MusicXML file; setting up a new score; entering notes with or without a MIDI keyboard; adding dynamics, markings, lyrics; and how to send out assignments to your students.
    Tech, Sat, 9:15-10:15, Waterfront 1ABC

  124. How Pre-Band Can Unite General and Instrumental Beginning Instruction
    Brittany Bauman, Nuvo Instrumental
    During this session, participants will actively explore the concept of "pre-band" and what it might look like in various classrooms. Activities will combine elementary general music experiences with beginning woodwind and brass instrumental skills. A new flexible curriculum called WindStars will be highlighted during this session and present ideas for transitioning to standard notation. WindStars is based on "sound before sight" and is firmly rooted in the National Music Standards. Nuvo instruments will be provided for attendees to participate in various pre-band activities.
    Coml, Sat, 9:15-10:15, Beacon Hill 2&3

  125. Let's Make Some Noise! Encouraging the Reluctant Singer
    Allison Flores, Needham Public Schools
    Are students put into your class because they are required to be in a music group and have nowhere else to go? Do you struggle to get these musicians to participate in singing? Success for these kids starts with making noise! This session explores different ways of encouraging the unwilling singer by; developing a risk-taking environment, minimizing the gap between school music and "the outside world", and emphasizing that everyone can sing! Attendees will leave with a new perspective on the reluctant singer, and different ideas on how to develop these students into confident singers.
    Choral, Sat, 9:15-10:15, Cambridge Complex

  126. 12 Steps to Music Literacy Using Conversational Solfege Level 2: Melodic Development
    John Feierabend, Retired
    Literature using advanced Solfege patterns with a parallel development of rhythm patterns in 2/4 and 6/8 meter will be presented. Opportunities for early experience in part singing are demonstrated with, rhythmic and melodic sight-reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation. Participants will experience a curriculum that grows out of tonal and rhythmic elements found in folk song to classical literature.
    Coml, Sat, 9:15-10:15, Back Bay Complex

  127. Creating on Any Device: Online music tech made easy
    John Mlynczak, Noteflight, a Hal Leonard Company
    Wondering how to teach music using Chromebooks or iPads with online tools? By combining music notation with a digital audio workstation, there are endless possibilities to incorporate music creation in all levels of music instruction. This session will demonstrate many proven lessons that can be used immediately, starting with free online software.
    Tech, Sat, 10:30-11:30, Waterfront 1ABC

  128. A Clarinet that Evolves with Your Students
    Katie Morrell, Eastman Music; Korinne Smith, Eastman Music
    The Backun Alpha Bb Clarinet is the result of years of research and development and the desire to give student clarinetists an affordable instrument that won't restrict their development.Backun Musical Services has developed a clarinet that can grow along with the progress of your student. The Alpha is a versatile instrument that can be enjoyed by any age and ability level; from beginner to professional. In the context of your school band program, this creates a clarinet that can be modified and adapted to stay with your young students from beginning band to high school graduation.
    Coml, Sat, 10:30-11:30, Beacon Hill 2&3

  129. Earthtones: Exploring Cultures Through Song
    Mary Ellen Junda, University of Connecticut
    Non-western music ensembles are becoming more common in secondary schools and higher education. Those teaching these ensembles are presented with a number of pedagogical challenges in intercultural transmissions on topics that include cultural representation, authenticity, and performance practice. This session focuses on the development of Earthtones Vocal Ensemble and the issues faced in bringing to life the songs of underrepresented people and critical periods in history. The organization and development of the ensemble, student reflections and video excerpts of programs will be shared, concluding with reflections on the benefits and challenges of directing a non-traditional ensemble.
    Choral, Sat, 10:30-11:30, Cambridge Complex

  130. Classroom Management: The Key to Successful Teaching
    Lillie Feierabend, Retired Music Teacher
    Music educators spend a great deal of time developing, designing and delivering wonderful lessons. Classroom management should also be the product of this type of thoughtful, intelligent, and sequential design. No matter how excellent the lesson, no matter how superb the musical examples, no matter how many content standards we can connect to, if students are not attentive, they are not learning. In a well-managed classroom, the focus is on the content and musical growth and development of each student. The ability to focus and be a successful learner is the foundation for a lifetime of learning.
    Coml, Sat, 10:30-11:30, Back Bay Complex

  131. Music Production: Recording and Mixing Techniques
    Chee-Ping Ho, Berklee College of Music
    This session explores the fundamentals of digital audio technology, microphones, recording techniques, audio signal flow, integration of MIDI with audio tracks, signal processing, editing and mixing techniques.
    Tech, Sat, 11:45-12:45, Waterfront 1ABC

  132. General Music: A Case for Ukulele
    Andrea Cook, Worcester Public Schools; Meredith Lord, Worcester Public Schools
    In this session we'll walk you through our homegrown ukulele curriculum and how we've changed middle school general music class from passive music appreciation to active music participation. You will have opportunities for hands-on learning and will be shown the steps needed to bring students through a successful ukulele playing unit. Though this curriculum was designed for middle school, it could easily be extended to upper elementary or high school. Bring your ukulele or use one of ours and get inspired!
    Gen Mus, Sat, 11:45-12:45, Cambridge Complex

  133. Intentional Movement in the Music Classroom
    Lillie Feierabend, Retired Music Teacher
    Think of your favorite finger play, action song or play party. Chances are there is some type of movement to enhance the song or chant. Children learn best when they are able to use their bodies. Most of our elementary repertoire contains a movement component which is worthy of the same explicit and intentional instruction that we devote to the tonal and rhythmic aspects of our curriculum. This lively session will share strategies and techniques to help children move purposefully and musically.
    Coml, Sat, 11:45-12:45, Back Bay Complex

Massachusetts Music Educators Association

MMEA logo

Michael LaCava
Interim Executive Director
PO Box 3886
South Attleboro, MA 02703-3886